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Financial literacy and retirement planning in Germany

  • BUCHER-KOENEN, TABEA
  • LUSARDI, ANNAMARIA

We examine financial literacy in Germany using data from the SAVE survey. We find that knowledge of basic financial concepts is lacking among women, the less educated, and those living in East Germany. In particular, those with low education and low income in East Germany have low financial literacy compared to their West German counterparts. Interestingly, there is no gender disparity in financial knowledge in the East. In order to investigate the nexus of causality between financial literacy and retirement planning, we develop an instrumental variables strategy by making use of regional variation in the financial knowledge of peers. We find a positive impact of financial knowledge on retirement planning.

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Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Journal of Pension Economics and Finance.

Volume (Year): 10 (2011)
Issue (Month): 04 (October)
Pages: 565-584

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jpenef:v:10:y:2011:i:04:p:565-584_00
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  1. Maarten vanRooij & Annamaria Lusardi & Rob Alessie, 2007. "Financial Literacy and Stock Market Participation," Working Papers wp162, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  2. Tabea Bucher-Koenen & Michael Ziegelmeyer, 2011. "Who lost the most? Financial Literacy, Cognitive Abilities, and the Financial Crisis," BCL working papers 54, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
  3. Luigi Guiso & Tullio Jappelli, 2002. "Stockholding in Italy," CSEF Working Papers 82, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  4. Börsch-Supan, Axel & Reil-Held, Anette & Schunk, Daniel, 2008. "Saving incentives, old-age provision and displacement effects: evidence from the recent German pension reform," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(03), pages 295-319, November.
  5. Axel Boersch-Supan & Christina B. Wilke, 2004. "The German Public Pension System: How it Was, How it Will Be," NBER Working Papers 10525, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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