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Investment in financial literacy, social security, and portfolio choice

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  • JAPPELLI, TULLIO
  • PADULA, MARIO

Abstract

We present an intertemporal portfolio choice model where individuals invest in financial literacy, save, allocate their wealth between a safe and a risky asset, and receive a pension when they retire. Financial literacy affects the excess return from and cost of stock-market participation. Investors simultaneously choose how much to save, their portfolio allocation, and the optimal investment in financial literacy. The model implies that one should observe a positive correlation between stock-market participation (and risky asset share, conditional on participation) and financial literacy, and a negative correlation between the generosity of the social security system and financial literacy. The model also implies that financial literacy accumulated early in life is positively correlated with the individual's wealth and portfolio allocations in later life. Using microeconomic cross-country data, we find support for these predictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Jappelli, Tullio & Padula, Mario, 2015. "Investment in financial literacy, social security, and portfolio choice," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(4), pages 369-411, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jpenef:v:14:y:2015:i:04:p:369-411_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Bucher-Koenen, Tabea & Lamla, Bettina, 2014. "The long Shadow of Socialism: On East-West German Differences in Financial Literacy," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100585, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Murtinu, Samuele & Piccirilli, Giulio & Sacchi, Agnese, 2016. "Fiscal Policy, Government Polarization, and the Economic Literacy of Voters," MPRA Paper 74864, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Arrondel, L. & Debbich, M. & Savignac, F., 2013. "Financial Literacy and Financial Planning in France," Working papers 465, Banque de France.
    4. Jappelli, Tullio & Padula, Mario, 2013. "Investment in financial literacy and saving decisions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 2779-2792.
    5. Noemi Oggero & Maria Cristina Rossi & Elisa Ughetto, 2020. "Entrepreneurial spirits in women and men. The role of financial literacy and digital skills," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 313-327, August.
    6. Xu Cui & Jing Jian Xiao & Jingtao Yi, 2019. "Employment Type, Residential Status And Consumer Financial Capability: Evidence From China Household Finance Survey," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 64(01), pages 57-81, March.
    7. Hiroshi Fujiki, 2019. "Who needs guidance from a financial adviser? Evidence from Japan," Working Papers on Central Bank Communication 011, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
    8. Sergio Longobardi & Margherita Maria Pagliuca & Andrea Regoli, 2018. "Can problem-solving attitudes explain the gender gap in financial literacy? Evidence from Italian students’ data," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 52(4), pages 1677-1705, July.
    9. repec:mea:meawpa:14282 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Hsiao, Yu-Jen & Tsai, Wei-Che, 2018. "Financial literacy and participation in the derivatives markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 15-29.
    11. Karolis Bielskis & Andrius Ciginas, 2020. "Household Wealth and Finances. Results for Households in Lithuania for 2017," Bank of Lithuania Discussion Paper Series 19, Bank of Lithuania.
    12. Nicola Branzoli, 2016. "Price dispersion and consumer inattention: evidence from the market of bank accounts," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1082, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    13. Kubitza, Christian & Hofmann, Annette & Steinorth, Petra, 2019. "Financial literacy and precautionary insurance," ICIR Working Paper Series 34/19, Goethe University Frankfurt, International Center for Insurance Regulation (ICIR).
    14. Tabea Bucher†Koenen & Bettina Lamla†Dietrich, 2018. "The Long Shadow of Socialism: Puzzling Evidence on East†West German Differences in Financial Literacy," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 47(2-3), pages 413-438, July.
    15. Cumurovic, Aida & Hyll, Walter, 2016. "Financial Literacy and Self-Employment," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145732, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    16. Adnan Balloch & Anamaria Nicolae & Dennis Philip, 2015. "Stock Market Literacy, Trust, and Participation," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 19(5), pages 1925-1963.
    17. Ćumurović, Aida & Hyll, Walter, 2016. "Financial Literacy and Self-employment," IWH Discussion Papers 11/2016, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    18. Oscar A. Stolper & Andreas Walter, 2017. "Financial literacy, financial advice, and financial behavior," Journal of Business Economics, Springer, vol. 87(5), pages 581-643, July.
    19. Li Liao & Jing Jian Xiao & Weiqiang Zhang & Congyi Zhou, 2017. "Financial literacy and risky asset holdings: evidence from China," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 57(5), pages 1383-1415, December.
    20. Khalily, M. A. Baqui, 2016. "Financial Inclusion, Financial Regulation, and Education in Bangladesh," ADBI Working Papers 621, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    21. Luqman Hakim & Martono Martono, 2019. "Fundamental Role of Macro and Microeconomics to Profitability and the Implications on Stock Return: Evidence from Banking Companies on the Indonesia Stock Exchange," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 9(6), pages 84-93.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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