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Do women ask for lower salaries? The supply side of the gender pay gap

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  • Martin Gonzalez-Rozada
  • Eduardo Levy Yeyati

Abstract

We explore a new rich dataset of online asking wages from a large online job application platform in Argentina. We find that women, on average, ask for a significant 6% less than men, a gender ask gap that increases with the “level” of the position (proxied, alternatively, by the seniority of the position and its average requested wage), virtually disappears for women in the 45-64 range, and is significantly smaller for female-dominated occupations, as measured by the female-to-male ratio.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Gonzalez-Rozada & Eduardo Levy Yeyati, 2018. "Do women ask for lower salaries? The supply side of the gender pay gap," Department of Economics Working Papers 2018_02, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.
  • Handle: RePEc:udt:wpecon:2018_02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Benjamin Artz & Amanda H. Goodall & Andrew J. Oswald, 2018. "Do Women Ask?," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 57(4), pages 611-636, October.
    2. Wiji Arulampalam & Alison L. Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2007. "Is There a Glass Ceiling over Europe? Exploring the Gender Pay Gap across the Wage Distribution," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(2), pages 163-186, January.
    3. Säve-Söderbergh, Jenny, 2007. "Are Women Asking for Low Wages? Gender Differences in Wage Bargaining Strategies and Ensuing Bargaining Success," Working Paper Series 7/2007, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    4. Grace Lordan & Jörn‐Steffen Pischke, 2022. "Does Rosie Like Riveting? Male and Female Occupational Choices," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 89(353), pages 110-130, January.
    5. Cortes, Patricia & Pan, Jessica, 2017. "Occupation and Gender," IZA Discussion Papers 10672, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Muriel Niederle & Lise Vesterlund, 2007. "Do Women Shy Away From Competition? Do Men Compete Too Much?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1067-1101.
    7. Roxana Barbulescu & Matthew Bidwell, 2013. "Do Women Choose Different Jobs from Men? Mechanisms of Application Segregation in the Market for Managerial Workers," Organization Science, INFORMS, vol. 24(3), pages 737-756, June.
    8. Bowles, Hannah Riley & Babcock, Linda & Lai, Lei, 2007. "Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiations: Sometimes it does hurt to ask," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 84-103, May.
    9. Kristin J. Kleinjans & Karl Fritjof Krassel & Anthony Dukes, 2017. "Occupational Prestige and the Gender Wage Gap," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(4), pages 565-593, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Casarico, A. & Lattanzio, S., 2019. "What Firms Do: Gender Inequality in Linked Employer-Employee Data," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1966, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    asking wage gap; gender wage gap; supply-side gender pay gap.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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