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Gender differences in competitiveness: empirical evidence from 100m races

In: Handbook on the Economics of Women in Sports

Author

Listed:
  • Bernd Frick
  • Friedrich Scheel

Abstract

Women’s sports have received much less attention from economists than from other social scientists. This Handbook fills that gap with a comprehensive economic analysis of women’s sports. It also analyzes how the behavior and treatment of female athletes reflect broad economic forces.

Suggested Citation

  • Bernd Frick & Friedrich Scheel, 2013. "Gender differences in competitiveness: empirical evidence from 100m races," Chapters, in: Eva Marikova Leeds & Michael A. Leeds (ed.), Handbook on the Economics of Women in Sports, chapter 14, pages 293-318, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14272_14
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781849809382.00024.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

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