IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pde93.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Joseph DeJuan

Personal Details

First Name:Joseph
Middle Name:
Last Name:DeJuan
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pde93
http://www.arts.uwaterloo.ca/~jdejuan/
University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo Ontario N2L-3G1 Canada
(519) 888-4567 ext. 3549

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Waterloo

Waterloo, Canada
http://economics.uwaterloo.ca/

: (519) 888-4567 ext 33695
(519) 725-0530
Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1
RePEc:edi:dewatca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Joseph DeJuan & Maria J. Luengo-Prado, 2005. "Consumption and Aggregate Constraints: International Evidence," Macroeconomics 0501018, EconWPA.
  2. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater, 2004. "Testing the Cross-Section Implications of Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis," Working Papers 04003, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2004.
  3. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater & Tony Wirjanto, 2003. "A Direct Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis with an Application to the US States," Working Papers 03001, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2003.
  4. John J. Seater & Joseph P. DeJuan., "undated". "A Cross Country Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis," Working Paper Series 15, North Carolina State University, Department of Economics.

Articles

  1. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater & Tony S. Wirjanto, 2010. "Testing the Stochastic Implications of the Permanent Income Hypothesis Using Canadian Provincial Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 89-108, February.
  2. DeJuan, Joseph P. & Seater, John J., 2007. "Testing the cross-section implications of Friedman's permanent income hypothesis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 820-849, April.
  3. Joseph P. Dejuan & Maria Jose Luengo-Prado, 2006. "Consumption and Aggregate Constraints: International Evidence," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(1), pages 81-99, February.
  4. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater & Tony Wirjanto, 2006. "Testing the permanent-income hypothesis: new evidence from West-German states ( Länder)," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 613-629, September.
  5. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater, 2006. "A Simple Test of Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(289), pages 27-46, February.
  6. Joseph DeJuan & Marc Tomljanovich, 2005. "Income convergence across Canadian provinces in the 20th century: Almost but not quite there," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 39(3), pages 567-592, September.
  7. Dejuan, Joseph P & Seater, John J & Wirjanto, Tony S, 2004. "A Direct Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis with an Application to the U.S. States," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 36(6), pages 1091-1103, December.
  8. Joseph Dejuan & Simon Gurr, 2004. "On the link between volatility and growth: evidence from Canadian Provinces," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(5), pages 279-282.
  9. Joseph Dejuan, 2003. "The Response of Consumption to Income Innovations: Evidence from UK Regions," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(5), pages 445-451.
  10. John W. Dawson & Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater & E. Frank Stephenson, 2001. "Economic information versus quality variation in cross-country data," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(4), pages 988-1009, November.
  11. DeJuan, Joseph P. & J. Seater, John, 1999. "The permanent income hypothesis:: Evidence from the consumer expenditure survey," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 351-376, April.
  12. Joseph De Juan & John Seater, 1997. "A Cross-country Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(3), pages 451-468.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. DeJuan, Joseph P. & Seater, John J., 2007. "Testing the cross-section implications of Friedman's permanent income hypothesis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 820-849, April.

    Mentioned in:

    1. On Why It is Important to Distinguish Between Consumption and Expenditures When Testing the Permanent Income Hypothesis
      by Josh in The Everyday Economist on 2017-01-14 01:23:10

Working papers

  1. Joseph DeJuan & Maria J. Luengo-Prado, 2005. "Consumption and Aggregate Constraints: International Evidence," Macroeconomics 0501018, EconWPA.

    Cited by:

    1. Xiujian Chen & Shu Lin & W. Robert Reed, 2006. "A Monte Carlo Evaluation of the Efficiency of the PCSE Estimator," Working Papers in Economics 06/14, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    2. Xiujian Chen & Shu Lin & W. Robert Reed, 2006. "Another Look at what to do with Time-series Cross-section Data," Working Papers in Economics 06/04, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    3. Faruk Balli & Eleonora Pierucci, 2015. "Globalization and international risk-sharing: do political and social factors matter more than economic integration?," CAMA Working Papers 2015-04, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

  2. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater, 2004. "Testing the Cross-Section Implications of Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis," Working Papers 04003, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2004.

    Cited by:

    1. Jakob B Madsen & Hui Yao, 2012. "Wealth Effects In Consumption: The Financial Accelerator And Banks’ Willingness To Lend," Monash Economics Working Papers 56-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    2. Inoue, Atsushi & Rossi, Barbara, 2011. "Testing for weak identification in possibly nonlinear models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 161(2), pages 246-261, April.
    3. Faik Bilgili & Hayriye Hilal Baðlýtaþ, 2016. "Testing the Permanent Income and Random Walk Hypotheses for Turkey†," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(4), pages 1371-1378.
    4. E. Pastrapa & C. Apostolopoulos, 2015. "Estimating Determinants of Borrowing: Evidence from Greece," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 210-223, June.

  3. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater & Tony Wirjanto, 2003. "A Direct Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis with an Application to the US States," Working Papers 03001, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2003.

    Cited by:

    1. Amanor-Boadu, Vincent & Zereyesus, Yacob Abrehe & Ross, Kara L., 2009. "Distribution of Local Government Revenue Sources and Citizen Well-Being," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46828, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    2. Baiardi, Donatella & Manera, Matteo & Menegatti, Mario, 2013. "Consumption and precautionary saving: An empirical analysis under both financial and environmental risks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 157-166.
    3. André K. Anundsen & Ragnar Nymoen, 2015. "Did US consumers ‘save for a rainy day’ before the Great Recession?," Working Paper 2015/08, Norges Bank.
    4. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater & Tony Wirjanto, 2006. "Testing the permanent-income hypothesis: new evidence from West-German states ( Länder)," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 613-629, September.
    5. KARGI, Bilal, 2014. "Türkiye Ekonomisinde Sürekli Gelir Hipotezine İlişkin Kanıtlar: Zaman Serileri Analizi (2004-2012)
      [Evidence for Turkey's Economy Permanent Income Hypothesis: Time Series Analysis (2004-2012)]
      ," MPRA Paper 55696, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Joseph DeJuan & Tony S. Wirjanto & Xinpeng Xu, 2016. "The Adjustment of Consumption to Income Changes Across Chinese Provinces," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 17(2), pages 235-253, November.
    7. Liping Gao & Hyeongwoo Kim & Yaoqi Zhang, 2013. "Revisiting the Empirical Inconsistency of the Permanent Income Hypothesis: Evidence from Rural China," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2013-05, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
    8. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater & Tony S. Wirjanto, 2010. "Testing the Stochastic Implications of the Permanent Income Hypothesis Using Canadian Provincial Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 89-108, February.
    9. Brady, Ryan R., 2008. "Structural breaks and consumer credit: Is consumption smoothing finally a reality?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1246-1268, September.

Articles

  1. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater & Tony S. Wirjanto, 2010. "Testing the Stochastic Implications of the Permanent Income Hypothesis Using Canadian Provincial Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 89-108, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Baiardi, Donatella & Manera, Matteo & Menegatti, Mario, 2013. "Consumption and precautionary saving: An empirical analysis under both financial and environmental risks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 157-166.
    2. Joseph DeJuan & Tony S. Wirjanto & Xinpeng Xu, 2016. "The Adjustment of Consumption to Income Changes Across Chinese Provinces," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 17(2), pages 235-253, November.

  2. DeJuan, Joseph P. & Seater, John J., 2007. "Testing the cross-section implications of Friedman's permanent income hypothesis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 820-849, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Joseph P. Dejuan & Maria Jose Luengo-Prado, 2006. "Consumption and Aggregate Constraints: International Evidence," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 68(1), pages 81-99, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater & Tony Wirjanto, 2006. "Testing the permanent-income hypothesis: new evidence from West-German states ( Länder)," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 613-629, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Alimi, R. Santos, 2015. "Estimating Consumption function under Permanent Income Hypothesis: A comparison between Nigeria and South Africa," MPRA Paper 65787, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. KARGI, Bilal, 2014. "Türkiye Ekonomisinde Sürekli Gelir Hipotezine İlişkin Kanıtlar: Zaman Serileri Analizi (2004-2012)
      [Evidence for Turkey's Economy Permanent Income Hypothesis: Time Series Analysis (2004-2012)]
      ," MPRA Paper 55696, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Eric Akobeng, 2017. "The Invisible Hand of Rain in Spending: Effect of Rainfall-Driven Agricultural Income on Per Capita Expenditure in Ghana," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 85(1), pages 98-122, March.
    4. Martin Beznoska & Richard Ochmann, 2013. "The interest elasticity of household savings: a structural approach with German micro data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 371-399, August.
    5. Timo Mitze, 2011. "Regional heterogeneity in consumption due to current income shocks: New evidence from the Permanent Income Hypothesis," ERSA conference papers ersa10p729, European Regional Science Association.

  5. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater, 2006. "A Simple Test of Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 73(289), pages 27-46, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Knabe & Steffen Rätzel, 2007. "Quantifying the psychological costs of unemployment: the role of permanent income," FEMM Working Papers 07012, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    2. Kazuto Masuda, 2011. "Pitfall of simple permanent income hypothesis model," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(1), pages 35-40.
    3. Jones, Carol Adaire & Milkove, Daniel & Paszkiewicz, Laura, 2010. "Farm Household Well-Being: Comparing Consumption- and Income-Based Measures," Economic Research Report 58299, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Alimi, R. Santos, 2015. "Estimating Consumption function under Permanent Income Hypothesis: A comparison between Nigeria and South Africa," MPRA Paper 65787, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Jones, Carol Adaire & Milkove, Daniel & Paszkiewicz, Laura, 2009. "Measuring Farm Household Well-Being: Comparing Consumption and Income-based Measures," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49355, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

  6. Joseph DeJuan & Marc Tomljanovich, 2005. "Income convergence across Canadian provinces in the 20th century: Almost but not quite there," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 39(3), pages 567-592, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Evan Capeluck, 2014. "Convergence Across Provincial Economies in Canada: Trends, Drivers, and Implications," CSLS Research Reports 2014-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    2. Cletus C. Coughlin & Thomas A. Garrett & Rubén Hernández-Murillo, 2007. "Spatial Dependence in Models of State Fiscal Policy Convergence," Public Finance Review, , vol. 35(3), pages 361-384, May.
    3. Tunali, Çiǧdem Börke & Yilanci, Veli, 2010. "Are per capita incomes of MENA countries converging or diverging?," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 389(21), pages 4855-4862.
    4. Alexandra Ferreira-Lopes & Álvaro Pina, 2011. "Business Cycles, Core, and Periphery in Monetary Unions: Comparing Europe and North America," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 565-592, September.
    5. Çağrı Levent USLU, 2017. "Provincial Income Inequality and Spatial Autocorrelation Across Turkish Provinces: 1992-20131," Sosyoekonomi Journal, Sosyoekonomi Society, issue 25(34).
    6. Firouz Fallahi & Gabriel Rodríguez, 2011. "Convergence In The Canadian Provinces: Evidence Using Unemployment Rates," Documentos de Trabajo / Working Papers 2011-322, Departamento de Economía - Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.
    7. Ramírez Carrera, Dionisio & Rodríguez, Gabriel, 2009. "Have European Unemployment Rates Converged?," Working Papers 2009-007, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
    8. Burcu Ozcan, 2014. "Does Income Converge among EU Member Countries following the Post-War Period? Evidence from the PANKPSS Test," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(3), pages 22-38, October.
    9. Vincent Geloso & Vadim Kufenko & Klaus Prettner, 2016. "Demographic change and regional convergence in Canada," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 36(4), pages 1904-1910.
    10. Mahamat Hamit-Haggar, 2013. "A note on convergence across Canadian provinces: new insights from the club clustering algorithm," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(2), pages 591-601, April.
    11. Lukas Matejovsky & Sandeep Mohapatra & Bodo Steiner, 2014. "The Dynamic Effects of Entrepreneurship on Regional Economic Growth: Evidence from Canada," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 611-639, December.
    12. Basher, Syed A. & Fachin, Stefano, 2008. "The long-term decline of internal migration in Canada – Ontario as a case study," MPRA Paper 6685, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Syed Basher & S. Fachin, 2008. "The long-term decline of internal migration in Canada: the case of Ontario," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 1(2), pages 171-181, December.

  7. Dejuan, Joseph P & Seater, John J & Wirjanto, Tony S, 2004. "A Direct Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis with an Application to the U.S. States," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 36(6), pages 1091-1103, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Joseph Dejuan & Simon Gurr, 2004. "On the link between volatility and growth: evidence from Canadian Provinces," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(5), pages 279-282.

    Cited by:

    1. Vicente Rios Ibáñez & Roberto Ezcurra, 2013. "Volatility and regional growth in Europe: Does space matter?," ERSA conference papers ersa13p133, European Regional Science Association.
    2. Charalampos Botsaris & Athanasios Tsagkanos, 2007. "Growth and volatility in the European Union: a linear or a non-parametric approach?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 65-69.
    3. Kyriakos C. Neanidis & Christos S. Savva, 2010. "Macroeconomic Uncertainty, Inflation and Growth: Regime-Dependent Effects in the G7," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 145, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    4. Martin Falk & Franz Sinabell, 2009. "A spatial econometric analysis of the regional growth and volatility in Europe," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 36(2), pages 193-207, May.
    5. Macri, Joseph & Sinha, Dipendra, 2007. "Does Black’s Hypothesis for Output Variability Hold for Mexico?," MPRA Paper 4021, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Ghulam MOHEY-UD-DIN* & Muhammad Wasif SIDDIQI**, 2017. "GDP FLUCTUATIONS AND LONG-RUN ECONOMIC GROWTH: A Study of Selected South Asian Countries," Pakistan Journal of Applied Economics, Applied Economics Research Centre, vol. 27(1), pages 41-66.
    7. Mickaël Clévenot & Marie Silvère Mbome, 2014. "Reassessing Vulnerability to Macroeconomic Volatility: a nonstationary panel approach," CEPN Working Papers hal-00951544, HAL.

  9. John W. Dawson & Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater & E. Frank Stephenson, 2001. "Economic information versus quality variation in cross-country data," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(4), pages 988-1009, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Yin‐Wong Cheung & Eiji Fujii, 2014. "Exchange Rate Misalignment Estimates—Sources Of Differences," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 91-121, March.
    2. John W. Dawson, 2015. "The Empirical Volatility-Growth Relationship: Is Economic Freedom the Missing Link?," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 30(Summer 20), pages 61-82.
    3. Mallick, Debdulal, 2015. "Elusive Relationship between Business-cycle Volatility and Long-run Growth," MPRA Paper 64502, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Andrey Launov & Olaf Posch & Klaus Wälde, 2014. "On the Estimation of the Volatility-Growth Link," CESifo Working Paper Series 5018, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Kyriakos C. Neanidis & Christos S. Savva, 2010. "Macroeconomic Uncertainty, Inflation and Growth: Regime-Dependent Effects in the G7," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 145, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    6. J. Vernon Henderson & Adam Storeygard & David N. Weil, 2009. "Measuring Economic Growth from Outer Space," NBER Working Papers 15199, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Dawson, John W. & Stephenson, E. Frank, 1997. "The link between volatility and growth: Evidence from the States," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 365-369, September.
    8. Salvatore D'Acunto & Sergio Destefanis & Marco Musella, 2004. "Exports, Supply Constraints and Growth: An Investigation using Regional Data," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 167-189.
    9. Johnson, Simon & Larson, William & Papageorgiou, Chris & Subramanian, Arvind, 2013. "Is newer better? Penn World Table Revisions and their impact on growth estimates," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 255-274.
    10. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater & Tony S. Wirjanto, 2010. "Testing the Stochastic Implications of the Permanent Income Hypothesis Using Canadian Provincial Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 89-108, February.
    11. Joseph Dejuan & Simon Gurr, 2004. "On the link between volatility and growth: evidence from Canadian Provinces," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(5), pages 279-282.
    12. Andrew Williams, 2014. "The effect of transparency on output volatility," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 101-129, May.
    13. Piotr Denderski & Christian Stoltenberg, 2015. "On Positive Value of Information in Risk Sharing," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-074/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
    14. Mallick, Debdulal, 2017. "The Growth-Volatility Relationship: What Does Volatility Decomposition Tell?," MPRA Paper 79397, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  10. DeJuan, Joseph P. & J. Seater, John, 1999. "The permanent income hypothesis:: Evidence from the consumer expenditure survey," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 351-376, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Andreas Knabe & Steffen Rätzel, 2007. "Quantifying the psychological costs of unemployment: the role of permanent income," FEMM Working Papers 07012, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    2. Rehkopf, David H. & Jencks, Christopher & Glymour, M. Maria, 2010. "The association of earnings with health in middle age: Do self-reported earnings for the previous year tell the whole story?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 431-439, August.
    3. Sònia Muñoz, 2006. "Wealth Effects in Europe; A Tale of Two Countries (Italy and the United Kingdom)," IMF Working Papers 06/30, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Noorhaslinda Kulub Abd. Rashid & Aslina Nasir & Nik Hashim Nik Mustapha & Nik Fuad Kamil, 2011. "Analysis Of Income And Expenditure Of Households In The East Coast Of Peninsular Malaysia," Journal of Global Business and Economics, Global Research Agency, vol. 2(1), pages 59-72, January.
    5. Magda Kandil & Ida Mirzaie, 2006. "Consumption and macroeconomic policies: Theory and evidence from developing countries," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 469-491.
    6. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater, 2004. "Testing the Cross-Section Implications of Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis," Working Papers 04003, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2004.
    7. Tomas Havranek & Anna Sokolova, 2016. "Do Consumers Really Follow a Rule of Thumb? Three Thousand Estimates from 130 Studies Say “Probably Not”," Working Papers IES 2016/15, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jul 2016.
    8. Jorge A. Fornero, 2010. "Ricardian Equivalence Proposition in a NK DSGE Model for two Large Economies: The EU and the US," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 563, Central Bank of Chile.
    9. Werner Röger & Jan in 't Veld, 2002. "Some selected simulation experiments with the European Commission's QUEST model," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 178, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    10. Camilo Sarmiento & Richard Just, 2005. "Empirical modelling of the aggregation error in the representative consumer model," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(10), pages 1163-1175.
    11. Shin-Ichi Nishiyama, 2011. "The Cross-Euler Equation Approach to testing for the Liquidity Constraint: Evidence from Macro and Micro Data," TERG Discussion Papers 273, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Tohoku University.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2005-01-23

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Joseph DeJuan should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.