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A Direct Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis with an Application to the US States

Author

Listed:
  • Joseph DeJuan

    (Department of Economics, University of Waterloo)

  • John Seater

    (Department of Economics, North Carolin State University)

  • Tony Wirjanto

    (Department of Economics, University of Waterloo)

Abstract

This paper tests the prediction of the Permanent Income Hypothesis (PIH) that news about future income induce a revision in consumption equal to the revision in permanent income. We use time-series data from 48 contiguous US states to perform the test. The empirical results provide some support for the PIH across states.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph DeJuan & John Seater & Tony Wirjanto, 2003. "A Direct Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis with an Application to the US States," Working Papers 03001, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2003.
  • Handle: RePEc:wat:wpaper:03001
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bbz:fcpbbr:v:9:y:2012:i:4:p:87-102 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Liping Gao & Hyeongwoo Kim & Yaoqi Zhang, 2013. "Revisiting the Empirical Inconsistency of the Permanent Income Hypothesis: Evidence from Rural China," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2013-05, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
    3. Baiardi, Donatella & Manera, Matteo & Menegatti, Mario, 2013. "Consumption and precautionary saving: An empirical analysis under both financial and environmental risks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 157-166.
    4. Joseph P. Dejuan & John J. Seater & Tony S. Wirjanto, 2010. "Testing the Stochastic Implications of the Permanent Income Hypothesis Using Canadian Provincial Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 72(1), pages 89-108, February.
    5. Amanor-Boadu, Vincent & Zereyesus, Yacob Abrehe & Ross, Kara L., 2009. "Distribution of Local Government Revenue Sources and Citizen Well-Being," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46828, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    6. André Kallåk Anundsen & Ragnar Nymoen, 2015. "Did US Consumers 'Save for a Rainy Day' Before the Great Recession?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5347, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Joseph DeJuan & John Seater & Tony Wirjanto, 2006. "Testing the permanent-income hypothesis: new evidence from West-German states ( Länder)," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 613-629, September.
    8. Joseph DeJuan & Tony S. Wirjanto & Xinpeng Xu, 2016. "The Adjustment of Consumption to Income Changes Across Chinese Provinces," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 17(2), pages 235-253, November.
    9. KARGI, Bilal, 2014. "Türkiye Ekonomisinde Sürekli Gelir Hipotezine İlişkin Kanıtlar: Zaman Serileri Analizi (2004-2012)
      [Evidence for Turkey's Economy Permanent Income Hypothesis: Time Series Analysis (2004-2012)]
      ," MPRA Paper 55696, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Brady, Ryan R., 2008. "Structural breaks and consumer credit: Is consumption smoothing finally a reality?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 1246-1268, September.

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