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Türkiye Ekonomisinde Sürekli Gelir Hipotezine İlişkin Kanıtlar: Zaman Serileri Analizi (2004-2012)
[Evidence for Turkey's Economy Permanent Income Hypothesis: Time Series Analysis (2004-2012)]

Author

Listed:
  • KARGI, Bilal

Abstract

In this study, income and consumption expenditures, which are the reflections of the economic growth’s supply and demand facades, are analyzed. There are six basic hypothesis, which try to explain how consumer spending affected from consumers' income levels and of these the most common is Friedman's "Permanent Income Hypothesis". In this study, evidence for this hypothesis is being sought from Turkey's economy data. As a result of the time-series analysis of quarterly data for the period 2004:01-2012:03, consumers, consumption expenditures are not only affected by current income but also influenced by the expectations of the next period. Indeed, expectations are calculated as the Granger cause of consumer spending. This finding is cited as evidence for Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis for Turkey's economy.

Suggested Citation

  • KARGI, Bilal, 2014. "Türkiye Ekonomisinde Sürekli Gelir Hipotezine İlişkin Kanıtlar: Zaman Serileri Analizi (2004-2012)
    [Evidence for Turkey's Economy Permanent Income Hypothesis: Time Series Analysis (2004-2012)]
    ," MPRA Paper 55696, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:55696
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/55696/1/MPRA_paper_55696.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Permanent Income Hypothesis; Growth; Turkey Economy; Consumption Expenditures; Time Series Analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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