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R&D, growth, and macroprudential policy in an economy undergoing boom-bust cycles

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  • Battiati, Claudio

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that credit booms and asset price bubbles may undermine economic growth even as they occur, regardless of whether a crisis follows, by crowding out investment in more productive, R&D-intensive industries. This paper incorporates Schumpeterian endogenous growth into a DSGE model with credit-constrained entrepreneurs to show how shocks affecting firms’ access to credit can generate boom-bust cycles featuring large fluctuations in land prices, consumption, and investment. During the expansion, rising land prices tend to crowd out capital and (especially) R&D investment: over the medium term, this results in a slowdown in the rate of creation of new (innovative) firms. Moreover, higher initial loan-to-value ratios tend to be associated with larger macroeconomic fluctuations. A counter-cyclical LTV ratio targeting credit growth has relevant stabilization effects but brings about small gains in terms of long-run consumption levels, and thus of welfare.

Suggested Citation

  • Battiati, Claudio, 2019. "R&D, growth, and macroprudential policy in an economy undergoing boom-bust cycles," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 299-324.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:59:y:2019:i:c:p:299-324
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmacro.2018.12.007
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Schumpeterian growth; Financial frictions; Land prices; Macroprudential policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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