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Environmental degradation as engine of undesirable economic growth via self-protection consumption choices

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  • Antoci, Angelo

Abstract

We analyze growth dynamics in an economy where the well-being of economic agents depends on three goods: leisure, a free access environmental good and a private good that can be consumed as a substitute for the environmental resource. The processes of production and consumption of the private good by each agent impose negative externalities on other agents through the depletion of the environmental good. This paper shows that, in such context, the existence of private substitutes for environmental goods may fuel an undesirable economic growth process. This process is driven by the continuous increase in agents' needs for private consumption generated by the progressive reduction in free consumption of the environmental good.

Suggested Citation

  • Antoci, Angelo, 2009. "Environmental degradation as engine of undesirable economic growth via self-protection consumption choices," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 1385-1397, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:68:y:2009:i:5:p:1385-1397
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sun, Cong & Kahn, Matthew E. & Zheng, Siqi, 2017. "Self-protection investment exacerbates air pollution exposure inequality in urban China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 468-474.
    2. Antoci, Angelo & Borghesi, Simone, 2012. "Preserving or escaping? On the welfare effects of environmental self-protective choices," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 248-254.
    3. Antoci, Angelo & Russu, Paolo & Ticci, Elisa, 2009. "Distributive impact of structural change: Does environmental degradation matter?," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 266-278, December.
    4. Angelo Antoci & Paolo Russu & Elisa Ticci, 2011. "Investement inflows and sustainable development in a natural resource-dependent economy," Department of Economic Policy, Finance and Development (DEPFID) University of Siena 0311, Department of Economic Policy, Finance and Development (DEPFID), University of Siena.
    5. Naz Onel & Avinandan Mukherjee, 2014. "The effects of national culture and human development on environmental health," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 79-101, February.
    6. Antoci, Angelo & Sodini, Mauro, 2009. "Indeterminacy, bifurcations and chaos in an overlapping generations model with negative environmental externalities," MPRA Paper 13750, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Carboni, Oliviero A. & Russu, Paolo, 2013. "Linear production function, externalities and indeterminacy in a capital-resource growth model," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(5), pages 422-428.
    8. Antoci, Angelo & Russu, Paolo & Ticci, Elisa, 2008. "Structural change, economic growth and environmental dynamics with heterogeneous agents," MPRA Paper 13668, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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