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International Contagion through Leveraged Financial Institutions

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  • Eric van Wincoop

Abstract

The 2008 –2009 financial crises, while originating in the United States, witnessed a drop in asset prices and output that was at least as large in the rest of the world. We investigate, in the context of a simple two-country model, whether this could have been the result of transmission through leveraged financial institutions. The paper highlights what the various transmission mechanisms associated with balance sheet losses are. For realistic parameters we find that the model cannot account for the global nature of the crisis, both in terms of the size of the impact and the extent of transmission.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric van Wincoop, 2013. "International Contagion through Leveraged Financial Institutions," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(3), pages 152-189, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aejmac:v:5:y:2013:i:3:p:152-89 Note: DOI: 10.1257/mac.5.3.152
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hualde, Javier & Velasco, Carlos, 2008. "Distribution-Free Tests Of Fractional Cointegration," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, pages 216-255.
    2. Eickmeier, Sandra & Ng, Tim, 2015. "How do US credit supply shocks propagate internationally? A GVAR approach," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 128-145.
    3. Flavin, Thomas J. & Sheenan, Lisa, 2015. "The role of U.S. subprime mortgage-backed assets in propagating the crisis: Contagion or interdependence?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 167-186.
    4. Trani, Tommaso, 2015. "Asset pledgeability and international transmission of financial shocks," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 49-77.
    5. Nguyen, Ha & Qian, Rong, 2014. "Demand collapse or credit crunch to firms? Evidence from the World Bank's financial crisis survey in Eastern Europe," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, pages 125-144.
    6. Bremus, Franziska & Buch, Claudia M. & Russ, Katheryn N. & Schnitzer, Monika, 2013. "Big Banks and Macroeconomic Outcomes: Theory and Cross-Country Evidence of Granularity," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80048, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    7. Stanimira Milcheva, 2012. "Monetary policy, financial intermediation, current account and housing market - how do they fit together?," ERES eres2012_151, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    8. Robert Kollmann, 2013. "Global Banks, Financial Shocks, and International Business Cycles: Evidence from an Estimated Model," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(s2), pages 159-195, December.
    9. Metiu, Norbert & Hilberg, Björn & Grill, Michael, 2016. "Credit constraints and the international propagation of US financial shocks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 67-80.
    10. Eickmeier, Sandra & Ng, Tim, 2011. "How do credit supply shocks propagate internationally? A GVAR approach," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2011,27, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
    11. Kristin J. Forbes, 2012. "The “Big C”: identifying and mitigating contagion," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 23-87.
    12. Makoto Nirei & Vladyslav Sushko & Julián Caballero, 2016. "Bank Capital Shock Propagation via Syndicated Interconnectedness," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 67-96, January.
    13. Brutti, Filippo & Sauré, Philip, 2015. "Transmission of sovereign risk in the Euro crisis," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 231-248.
    14. Jarko Fidrmuc & Philipp Schreiber & Martin Siddiqui, 2015. "The Transmission of Bank Funding to Corporate Loans: Deleveraging in Germany," Open Economies Review, Springer, pages 581-597.
    15. Kristin Forbes, 2012. "The "Big C": Identifying Contagion," NBER Working Papers 18465, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Milcheva, Stanimira, 2013. "Cross-country effects of regulatory capital arbitrage," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5329-5345.
    17. Robert Kollmann, 2012. "Global Banks, Financial Shocks and International Business Cycles: Evidence from Estimated Models," 2012 Meeting Papers 840, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • F44 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Business Cycles
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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