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Financial Frictions, Financial Integration and the International Propagation of Shocks

  • Giovanni Lombardo

    (European Central Bank)

  • Luca Dedola

    (European Central Bank and CEPR)

risky assets, if asset markets are integrated across the board, reflecting a strong pressure towards the cross-border equalization of external finance premia faced by levered investors. In turn, the resulting global flight to quality may bring about tight international linkages in (de-)leveraging, financial and macroeconomic dynamics.

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Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 288.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:288
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Society for Economic Dynamics Marina Azzimonti Department of Economics Stonybrook University 10 Nicolls Road Stonybrook NY 11790 USA

Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/
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  1. Coeurdacier, Nicolas & Kollmann, Robert & Martin, Philippe, 2009. "International portfolios, capital accumulation and foreign assets dynamics," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 27, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  2. Christiano, Lawrence & Motto, Roberto & Rostagno, Massimo, 2008. "Shocks, structures or monetary policies? The Euro Area and US after 2001," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 2476-2506, August.
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  8. Faia, Ester, 2007. "Finance and international business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 1018-1034, May.
  9. Kaminsky, Graciela L. & Reinhart, Carmen M., 2000. "On crises, contagion, and confusion," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 145-168, June.
  10. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
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