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Do Male Workers Prefer Male Leaders? An Analysis of Principals' Effects on Teacher Retention

Author

Listed:
  • Aliza N. Husain
  • David A. Matsa
  • Amalia R. Miller

Abstract

Using a 40-year panel of all public school teachers and principals in New York State, we explore how female principals affect rates of teacher turnover—an important determinant of school quality. We find that male teachers are about 12% more likely to leave their schools when they work under female principals than under male principals. In contrast, we find no such effects for female teachers. Furthermore, when male teachers request transfers, they are more likely to be to schools with male principals. These results suggest that opposition from male subordinates could inhibit female progress in leadership.

Suggested Citation

  • Aliza N. Husain & David A. Matsa & Amalia R. Miller, 2018. "Do Male Workers Prefer Male Leaders? An Analysis of Principals' Effects on Teacher Retention," NBER Working Papers 25263, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25263
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J45 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Public Sector Labor Markets
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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