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Correcting The Errors : A Note On Volatility Forecast Evaluation Based On High-Frequency Data And Realized Volatilities

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  • Torben G. ANDERSEN
  • Tim BOLLERSLEV
  • Nour MEDDAHI

Abstract

This note develops general model-free adjustment procedures for the calculation of unbiased volatility loss functions based on practically feasible realized volatility benchmarks. The procedures, which exploit the recent asymptotic distributional results in Barndorff-Nielsen and Shephard (2002a), are both easy to implement and highly accurate in empirically realistic situations. On properly accounting for the measurement errors in the volatility forecast evaluations reported in Andersen, Bollerslev, Diebold and Labys (2003), the adjustments result in markedly higher estimates for the true degree of return-volatility predictability.

Suggested Citation

  • Torben G. ANDERSEN & Tim BOLLERSLEV & Nour MEDDAHI, 2002. "Correcting The Errors : A Note On Volatility Forecast Evaluation Based On High-Frequency Data And Realized Volatilities," Cahiers de recherche 21-2002, Centre interuniversitaire de recherche en économie quantitative, CIREQ.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtl:montec:21-2002
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2002. "Estimating quadratic variation using realized variance," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 457-477.
    2. Neil Shephard, 2005. "Stochastic Volatility," Economics Papers 2005-W17, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    3. Fabienne Comte & Eric Renault, 1998. "Long memory in continuous-time stochastic volatility models," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(4), pages 291-323.
    4. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold & Paul Labys, 1999. "The Distribution of Exchange Rate Volatility," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 99-08, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    5. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold & Paul Labys, 2003. "Modeling and Forecasting Realized Volatility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(2), pages 579-625, March.
    6. Nour Meddahi, 2001. "An Eigenfunction Approach for Volatility Modeling," CIRANO Working Papers 2001s-70, CIRANO.
    7. Nour Meddahi, 2002. "A theoretical comparison between integrated and realized volatility," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 479-508.
    8. Torben G. Andersen & Luca Benzoni & Jesper Lund, 2002. "An Empirical Investigation of Continuous-Time Equity Return Models," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(3), pages 1239-1284, June.
    9. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold, 2002. "Parametric and Nonparametric Volatility Measurement," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 02-27, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
    10. Yock Y. Chong & David F. Hendry, 1986. "Econometric Evaluation of Linear Macro-Economic Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(4), pages 671-690.
    11. Andreou, Elena & Ghysels, Eric, 2002. "Rolling-Sample Volatility Estimators: Some New Theoretical, Simulation, and Empirical Results," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(3), pages 363-376, July.
    12. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Nour Meddahi, 2004. "Analytical Evaluation Of Volatility Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1079-1110, November.
    13. Andersen, Torben G & Bollerslev, Tim, 1998. "Answering the Skeptics: Yes, Standard Volatility Models Do Provide Accurate Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 885-905, November.
    14. Bollerslev, Tim & Zhou, Hao, 2002. "Estimating stochastic volatility diffusion using conditional moments of integrated volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 33-65, July.
    15. Gençay, Ramazan & Dacorogna, Michel & Muller, Ulrich A. & Pictet, Olivier & Olsen, Richard, 2001. "An Introduction to High-Frequency Finance," Elsevier Monographs, Elsevier, edition 1, number 9780122796715.
    16. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2001. "Non-Gaussian Ornstein-Uhlenbeck-based models and some of their uses in financial economics," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series B, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 63(2), pages 167-241.
    17. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2001. "How accurate is the asymptotic approximation to the distribution of realised volatility?," Economics Papers 2001-W16, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2005. "Variation, jumps, market frictions and high frequency data in financial econometrics," Economics Papers 2005-W16, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    2. Asai, Manabu & McAleer, Michael & Medeiros, Marcelo C., 2012. "Modelling and forecasting noisy realized volatility," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 217-230, January.
    3. Christoffersen, Peter & Mazzotta, Stefano, 2004. "The informational content of over-the-counter currency options," Working Paper Series 366, European Central Bank.
    4. Alessandra Amendola & Giuseppe Storti, 2009. "Combination of multivariate volatility forecasts," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2009-007, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    5. Scott I. White & Adam E. Clements & Stan Hurn, 2004. "Discretised Non-Linear Filtering for Dynamic Latent Variable Models: with Application to Stochastic Volatility," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 46, Econometric Society.
    6. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2004. "A Feasible Central Limit Theory for Realised Volatility Under Leverage," Economics Papers 2004-W03, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    7. Amendola, Alessandra & Storti, Giuseppe, 2008. "A GMM procedure for combining volatility forecasts," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 52(6), pages 3047-3060, February.
    8. Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E. & Shephard, Neil, 2006. "Impact of jumps on returns and realised variances: econometric analysis of time-deformed Levy processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 131(1-2), pages 217-252.
    9. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold, 2003. "Some Like it Smooth, and Some Like it Rough: Untangling Continuous and Jump Components in Measuring, Modeling, and Forecasting Asset Return Volatility," PIER Working Paper Archive 03-025, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 01 Sep 2003.

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