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Training, Job Satisfaction and Workplace Performance in Britain: Evidence from WERS 2004


  • Jones, Richard J.

    () (Swansea University)

  • Latreille, Paul L.

    () (University of Sheffield)

  • Sloane, Peter J.

    () (Swansea University)


This paper analyses the relationship between training, job satisfaction and workplace performance using the British 2004 Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS). Several measures of performance are analysed including absence, quits, financial performance, labour productivity and product quality. While there is clear evidence that training is positively associated with job satisfaction, and job satisfaction in turn is positively associated with most measures of performance, the relationship between training and performance is complex, depending on both the particular measures of training and of performance used in the analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Jones, Richard J. & Latreille, Paul L. & Sloane, Peter J., 2008. "Training, Job Satisfaction and Workplace Performance in Britain: Evidence from WERS 2004," IZA Discussion Papers 3677, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3677

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    Cited by:

    1. Picchio, Matteo & van Ours, Jan C., 2013. "Retaining through training even for older workers," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 29-48.
    2. Semih Tumen & Tugba Zeydanli, 2016. "Social interactions in job satisfaction," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(3), pages 426-455, June.
    3. Pruneda, Gabriel, 2014. "Employee coverage of high-performance work systems in Spain: a comparative analysis before and during economic retrenchment," MPRA Paper 83909, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Daniel Dietz & Thomas Zwick, 2016. "The retention effect of training – portability, visibility, and credibility," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0113, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    5. Philipp Grunau, 2016. "The impact of overeducated and undereducated workers on establishment-level productivity: First evidence for Germany," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 372-392, May.
    6. Montizaan, Raymond M. & Vendrik, Maarten C.M., 2014. "Misery Loves Company: Exogenous shocks in retirement expectations and social comparison effects on subjective well-being," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 1-26.
    7. Cueto, Begona & Pruneda, Gabriel, 2015. "Job Satisfaction of Wage and Self-Employed workers. Do preferences make a difference?," MPRA Paper 65432, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Brehm, Margaret & Imberman, Scott A. & Lovenheim, Michael F., 2017. "Achievement effects of individual performance incentives in a teacher merit pay tournament," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 133-150.
    9. Claudia Burgard & Katja Görlitz, 2014. "Continuous training, job satisfaction and gender: An empirical analysis using German panel data," Evidence-based HRM: A Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(2), pages 126-144, October.
    10. Alessandro Tampieri, 2010. "Sex and the Uni: Higher Education Effects in Job and Marital Satisfaction," Discussion Papers in Economics 10/07, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Sep 2010.
    11. Sebastian NIELEN & Alexander SCHIERSCH, 2016. "Productivity in German manufacturing firms: Does fixed-term employment matter?," International Labour Review, International Labour Organization, vol. 155(4), pages 535-561, December.
    12. Ahmad Bodla, Ali & Hussain, Matloub & Chen, Chiyin, 2014. "Determinants of Job Satisfaction in Academic Professionals of Pakistan," Sukkur IBA Journal of Management and Business, Sukkur IBA University, vol. 1(1), pages 20-39, October.
    13. Anna-Elisabeth Thum & Miroslav Beblavy, 2014. "Do Acquaintances and Friends Make Us Learn?: Social Capital and Lifelong Learning in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 673, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    14. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2012. "Does high involvement management improve worker wellbeing?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 660-680.
    15. Claudia Burgard & Katja Görlitz, 2011. "Continuous Training, Job Satisfaction and Gender – An Empirical Analysis Using German Panel Data," Ruhr Economic Papers 0265, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    16. Burgard, Claudia & Görlitz, Katja, 2011. "Continuous Training, Job Satisfaction and Gender – An Empirical Analysis Using German Panel Data," Ruhr Economic Papers 265, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    17. Katrin Breuer & Patrick Kampkoetter, 2012. "Do Employees Reciprocate to Intra-Firm Trainings? An Analysis of Absenteeism and Turnover Rates," Cologne Graduate School Working Paper Series 03-09, Cologne Graduate School in Management, Economics and Social Sciences.
    18. Van Aerden, Karen & Puig-Barrachina, Vanessa & Bosmans, Kim & Vanroelen, Christophe, 2016. "How does employment quality relate to health and job satisfaction in Europe? A typological approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 132-140.
    19. repec:zbw:rwirep:0265 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Federico Huneeus & Oscar Landerretche & Esteban Puentes, 2012. "Multidimensional Measure of Job Quality: Persistence and Heterogeneity in a Developing Country," Working Papers wp357, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    21. Sergei Scherbov & Warren C. Sanderson & Marija Mamolo, 2014. "Quantifying policy tradeoffs to support aging populations," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(20), pages 579-608, March.
    22. Begoña Cueto & Gabriel Pruneda, 2017. "Job Satisfaction of Wage and Self-Employed Workers. Do Job Preferences Make a Difference?," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 12(1), pages 103-123, March.

    More about this item


    financial performance; quits; absence; job satisfaction; training; labour market; product quality;

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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