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Absenteeism in the UK: A Comparison Across Genders

Author

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  • Sarah Bridges
  • Karen Mumford

Abstract

We analyse an empirical model of absence from work based upon a variant of the traditional work-leisure model of labour supply. The model is tested with data from the 1993 UK Family Expenditure Survey (FES) and a comparison of absenteeism is made across genders. We find substantial differences in the probability of absenteeism across gender and various family situations. It appears that it is marital status rather than the presence of children that is driving this gender difference. We also find that our conclusions concerning gender differences in absenteeism are sensitive to the definition of absenteeism used and that the differences in the determination of these measures may help to explain some of the existing disagreements in the literature.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah Bridges & Karen Mumford, "undated". "Absenteeism in the UK: A Comparison Across Genders," Discussion Papers 00/12, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:00/12
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    File URL: https://www.york.ac.uk/media/economics/documents/discussionpapers/2000/0012.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Moral De Blas, Alfonso & Corrales-Herrero, Helena & Martín-Román, Ángel, 2012. "Glass Ceiling or Slippery Floors? Understanding Gender Differences in the Spanish Worker’s Compensation System/¿Techo de cristal o suelo resbaladizo? Comprendiendo las diferencias de género en el sist," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 311-340, Abril.
    2. Veliziotis, Michail, 2010. "Unionization and sickness absence from work in the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-15, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Melanie K. Jones & Richard J. Jones & Paul L. Latreille & Peter J. Sloane, 2009. "Training, Job Satisfaction, and Workplace Performance in Britain: Evidence from WERS 2004," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 139-175, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    absenteeism; gender differences.;

    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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