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La soddisfazione lavorativa dell’infermiere. Confronto tra lavoro ideale e realtà organizzativa: uno studio preliminare
[The nurse job satisfaction. Comparison between ideal job and organizational reality: a preliminary study]

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Listed:
  • Ferrari, Filippo

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to present preliminary findings of a research on job satisfaction in relation to a professional profile (the nurse), analyzing aspects of work that can be identified as antecedents according to their correlation with greater satisfaction as a whole. This research has correlated the ideal aspects of working with these issues effectively, and subsequently correlated to the outcome of this comparison (mismatch) with the overall job satisfaction. The survey showed frustration in the expectations of workers that have an impact on satisfaction, particularly as regards their ability to perform work consistent with their skills possessed, being informed of what happens in the company and the opportunity to have an estimated head.

Suggested Citation

  • Ferrari, Filippo, 2010. "La soddisfazione lavorativa dell’infermiere. Confronto tra lavoro ideale e realtà organizzativa: uno studio preliminare [The nurse job satisfaction. Comparison between ideal job and organizational ," MPRA Paper 24798, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:24798
    as

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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/24798/1/MPRA_paper_24798.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job satisfaction; nurse; ideal job and organizational reality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • M54 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Labor Management

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