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The likely impact of COVID-19 on education: Reflections based on the existing literature and recent international datasets

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Abstract

In order to reduce the spread of COVID-19, most countries around the world have decided to temporarily close educational institutions. However, learning has not stopped but is now fully taking place online as schools and universities provide remote schooling. Using existing literature and evidence from recent international data (Eurostat, PISA, ICILS, PIRLS, TALIS), this report attempts to gain a better understanding of how the COVID-19 crisis may affect students’ learning. It looks at the different direct and indirect ways through which the virus and the measures adopted to contain it may impact children’s achievement. ‘Very conservative’ estimates for a few selected EU countries consistently indicate that, on average, students will suffer a learning loss. It is also suggested that COVID-19 will not affect students equally, will influence negatively both cognitive and non-cognitive skills acquisition, and may have important long-term consequences in addition to the short-term ones.

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  • Giorgio Di Pietro & Federico Biagi & Patricia Costa & Zbigniew Karpinski & Jacopo Mazza, 2020. "The likely impact of COVID-19 on education: Reflections based on the existing literature and recent international datasets," JRC Working Papers JRC121071, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
  • Handle: RePEc:ipt:iptwpa:jrc121071
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    File URL: https://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/handle/JRC121071
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    Cited by:

    1. Engzell, Per & Frey, Arun & Verhagen, Mark D., 2020. "Learning Inequality During the Covid-19 Pandemic," SocArXiv ve4z7, Center for Open Science.
    2. Francesco Agostinelli & Matthias Doepke & Giuseppe Sorrenti & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2020. "When the Great Equalizer Shuts Down: Schools, Peers, and Parents in Pandemic Times," NBER Working Papers 28264, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; student learning; inequalities; Covid-19;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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