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The Economics of Parenting

Author

Listed:
  • Matthias Doepke
  • Giuseppe Sorrenti
  • Fabrizio Zilibotti

Abstract

Parenting decisions are among the most consequential choices people make throughout their lives. Starting with the work of pioneers such as Gary Becker, economists have used the toolset of their discipline to understand what parents do and how parents' actions affect their children. In recent years, the literature on parenting within economics has increasingly leveraged findings and concepts from related disciplines that also deal with parent-child interactions. For example, economists have developed models to understand the choice between various parenting styles that were first explored in the developmental psychology literature, and have estimated detailed empirical models of children's accumulation of cognitive and noncognitive skills in response to parental and other inputs. In this paper, we survey the economic literature on parenting and point out promising directions for future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthias Doepke & Giuseppe Sorrenti & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2019. "The Economics of Parenting," NBER Working Papers 25533, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:25533
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gordon B. Dahl & Lance Lochner, 2012. "The Impact of Family Income on Child Achievement: Evidence from the Earned Income Tax Credit," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 1927-1956, August.
    2. Doepke, Matthias & Sorrenti, Giuseppe & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 2019. "The Economics of Parenting," IZA Discussion Papers 12108, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniela Del Boca & Christopher Flinn & Ewout Verriest & Matthew Wiswall, 2019. "Actors in the Child Development Process," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 560, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    2. Matthias Doepke & Giuseppe Sorrenti & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2019. "The Economics of Parenting," NBER Working Papers 25533, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. repec:red:ecodyn:v:20:y:2019:i:1:interview is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R20 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - General

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