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Parenting Style as an Investment in Human Development

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  • Cobb-Clark, Deborah A
  • Salamanca, Nicholas
  • Zhu, Anna

Abstract

We propose a household production function approach to human development in which the role of parenting style in child rearing is explicitly considered. Specifically, we model parenting style as an investment in human development that depends not only on inputs of time and market goods, but also on attention, i.e. cognitive effort. Socioeconomic disadvantage is linked to parenting style and human development through the constraints that it places on cognitive capacity. Our model finds empirical support. We demonstrate that parenting style is a construct that is distinct from standard goods- and time-intensive parental investments and that effective parenting styles are negatively correlated with socioeconomic disadvantage. Moreover, parenting style is an important determinant of young adult’s human capital net of other parental investments.

Suggested Citation

  • Cobb-Clark, Deborah A & Salamanca, Nicholas & Zhu, Anna, 2016. "Parenting Style as an Investment in Human Development," Working Papers 2016-01, University of Sydney, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:syd:wpaper:2016-01
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lin Zhang & Shinsuke Ikeda, 2017. "Intergenerational Transmission of Authoritative Parenting Style: Evidence from Japan," ISER Discussion Paper 1008, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    2. Orla Doyle, 2017. "The First 2,000 Days and Child Skills: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment of Home Visiting," Working Papers 201715, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    3. Fletcher Jason M. & Schurer Stefanie, 2017. "Origins of Adulthood Personality: The Role of Adverse Childhood Experiences," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 1-22, April.
    4. repec:ces:ifodic:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:19307500 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Deckers, Thomas & Falk, Armin & Kosse, Fabian & Pinger, Pia & Schildberg-Hörisch, Hannah, 2017. "Socio-economic status and inequalities in children's IQ and economic preferences," DICE Discussion Papers 274, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    6. Stefanie Schurer & Kristian Trajkovski, 2018. "Understanding the mechanisms through which adverse childhood experiences affect lifetime economic outcomes," Working Papers 2018-033, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    7. repec:ibn:ijefaa:v:10:y:2018:i:1:p:64-73 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Schurer, Stefanie & Trajkovski, Kristian, 2018. "Understanding the Mechanisms through Which Adverse Childhood Experiences Affect Lifetime Economic Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 11450, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Daniela Del Boca & Enrica Maria Martino & Daniela Piazzalunga, 2017. "Investments in Early Education and Child Outcomes: The Short and the Long Run," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(1), pages 43-48, 04.
    10. Victoria Baranov & Sonia Bhalotra & Pietro Biroli & Joanna Maselko, 2018. "Maternal Depression, Women’s Empowerment, and Parental Investment: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial," Working Papers 2018-021, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    11. Baranov, Victoria & Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Biroli, Pietro & Maselko, Joanna, 2017. "Maternal Depression, Women’s Empowerment, and Parental Investment: Evidence from a Large Randomized Control Trial," IZA Discussion Papers 11187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    parenting style; cognitive load; locus of control; socioeconomic disadvantage; parental investments; human development;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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