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Origins of Social Immobility and Inequality: Parenting and Early Child Development

Author

Listed:
  • John Ermisch

    (Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, ermij@essex.ac.uk)

Abstract

There is growing evidence that differences in children's intellectual, emotional and behavioural development by parents' socio-economic status emerge at early ages and that these differences cast a long shadow over subsequent achievements. This article demonstrates with the Millennium Cohort Study that differences by parents' income group in cognitive and behavioural development emerge by the child's third birthday. It shows that an important part of these differences can be accounted for by `what parents do' in terms of educational activities and parenting style.

Suggested Citation

  • John Ermisch, 2008. "Origins of Social Immobility and Inequality: Parenting and Early Child Development," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 205(1), pages 62-71, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:niesru:v:205:y:2008:i:1:p:62-71
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Silke Anger & Daniel D. Schnitzlein, 2017. "Cognitive skills, non-cognitive skills, and family background: evidence from sibling correlations," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 591-620, April.
    2. Andrew Dickerson & Gurleen K. Popli, 2016. "Persistent poverty and children's cognitive development: evidence from the UK Millennium Cohort Study," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 179(2), pages 535-558, February.
    3. Mónica Hernández-Alava & Gurleen Popli, 2017. "Children’s Development and Parental Input: Evidence From the UK Millennium Cohort Study," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 485-511, April.
    4. Frauke H. Peter & Pia S. Schober & Katharina C. Spiess, 2016. "Early Birds in Day Care: The Social Gradient in Starting Day Care and Children’s Non-cognitive Skills," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 62(4), pages 725-751.
    5. Chikako Yamauchi, 2010. "Parental Investment in Children: Differential Pathways of Parental Education and Mental Health," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(273), pages 210-226, June.
    6. Del Bono, Emilia & Ermisch, John, 2009. "Birth weight and the dynamics of early cognitive and behavioural development," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Anger, Silke & Heineck, Guido, 2010. "Do Smart Parents Raise Smart Children? The Intergenerational Transmission of Cognitive Abilities," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 1105-1132.
    8. Anger, Silke, 2011. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Skills During Adolescence and Young Adulthood," IZA Discussion Papers 5749, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Kristoffersen, Jannie H.G. & Obel, Carsten & Smith, Nina, 2015. "Gender differences in behavioral problems and school outcomes," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 75-93.
    10. Platt, Lucinda & Haux, Tina & Rosenberg, Rachel, 2015. "Parenting and post-separation contact: what are the links?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 62353, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    11. Zhen Zeng & Yu Xie, 2014. "The Effects of Grandparents on Children’s Schooling: Evidence From Rural China," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 599-617, April.
    12. Elizabeth Washbrook & Paul Gregg & Carol Propper, 2014. "A decomposition analysis of the relationship between parental income and multiple child outcomes," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 177(4), pages 757-782, October.
    13. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Salamanca, Nicolas & Zhu, Anna, 2016. "Parenting Style as an Investment in Human Development," IZA Discussion Papers 9686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Peter, Frauke, 2016. "The effect of involuntary maternal job loss on children's behaviour and non-cognitive skills," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 43-63.
    15. Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G. & Smith, Nina, 2013. "Gender Differences in the Effects of Behavioral Problems on School Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 7410, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Tina Haux & Lucinda Platt & Rachel Rosenberg, 2015. "Parenting and post-separation contact: what are the links?," CASE Papers /189, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    17. Wehby, George L. & McCarthy, Ann Marie, 2013. "Economic gradients in early child neurodevelopment: A multi-country study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 86-95.

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