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Family income, parenting styles and child behavioural-emotional outcomes

Author

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  • Martin Dooley

    (Department of Economics, McMaster University, Canada)

  • Jennifer Stewart

    (School of Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University, Canada)

Abstract

A positive relationship between income and child outcomes has been observed in data from numerous countries. A key question concerns the extent to which this association represents a causal relationship as opposed to unobserved heterogeneity. We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to implement a series of empirical strategies for estimating the existence and size of the effect of income on behavioural-emotional outcomes. We also examine the role of parenting style. Our results indicate that there is little evidence of an effect of income on behavioural-emotional scores. The exclusion of parenting style from the models was found to not bias the estimated income effect, but parenting style was found to have a consistent impact on child outcomes. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Dooley & Jennifer Stewart, 2007. "Family income, parenting styles and child behavioural-emotional outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 145-162.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:16:y:2007:i:2:p:145-162
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1142
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1142
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pierre Merrigan & Philip Lefebvre, 2002. "The Effect of Childcare and Early Education Arrangements on Developmental Outcomes of Young Children," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 28(2), pages 159-185, June.
    2. Peter Burton & Shelley Phipps & Lori Curtis, 2002. "All in the Family: A Simultaneous Model of Parenting Style and Child Conduct," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 368-372, May.
    3. Rhonda Kornberger & Janet E. Fast & Deanna L. Williamson, 2001. "Welfare or Work: Which is Better for Canadian Children?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 27(4), pages 407-421, December.
    4. Anderson, Patricia M. & Butcher, Kristin F. & Levine, Phillip B., 2003. "Maternal employment and overweight children," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 477-504, May.
    5. Martin Dooley & Ellen Lipman & Jennifer Stewart, 2005. "Exploring the Good Mother Hypothesis: Do Child Outcomes Vary with the Mother's Share of Income?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 31(2), pages 123-144, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mario Fiorini & Michael P. Keane, 2014. "How the Allocation of Children's Time Affects Cognitive and Noncognitive Development," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 787-836.
    2. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Salamanca, Nicolas & Zhu, Anna, 2016. "Parenting Style as an Investment in Human Development," IZA Discussion Papers 9686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Fletcher, Jason M. & Wolfe, Barbara, 2016. "The importance of family income in the formation and evolution of non-cognitive skills in childhood," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 143-154.
    4. repec:esx:essedp:756 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Janet Currie & Mark Stabile, 2007. "Mental Health in Childhood and Human Capital," NBER Chapters,in: The Problems of Disadvantaged Youth: An Economic Perspective, pages 115-148 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jason Fletcher & Barbara Wolfe, 2014. "Increasing Our Understanding Of The Health‐Income Gradient In Children," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4), pages 473-486, April.
    7. Sciulli, Dario, 2016. "Adult employment probabilities of socially maladjusted children," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 9-22.
    8. Donal O’Neill & Sinéad McGilloway & Michael Donnelly & Tracey Bywater & Paul Kelly, 2013. "A cost-effectiveness analysis of the Incredible Years parenting programme in reducing childhood health inequalities," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(1), pages 85-94, February.
    9. Violato, Mara & Petrou, Stavros & Gray, Ron, 2009. "The relationship between household income and childhood respiratory health in the United Kingdom," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 955-963, September.
    10. Mario Fiorini & Michael P. Keane, 2014. "How the Allocation of Children's Time Affects Cognitive and Noncognitive Development," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 787 - 836.

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