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Jennifer M. Stewart

Personal Details

First Name:Jennifer
Middle Name:M.
Last Name:Stewart
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pst248

Affiliation

School of Public Policy and Administration
Carleton University

Ottawa, Canada
http://www.carleton.ca/sppa/

:

Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6
RePEc:edi:spcarca (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Jennifer Stewart & Eamon O'Shea & Cam Donaldson & Phil Shackley, 2000. "Do Ordering Effects Matter in Willingness-to-pay Studies of Health Care?," Working Papers 0046, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 2000.
  2. Jennifer Stewart, 1999. "The Impact of Health Status on the Duration of Unemployment Spells and the Implications for Studies of the Impact of Unemployment on Health Status," Working Papers 33, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 1999.
  3. Jennifer Stewart & Martin Dooley, "undated". "The Duration of Spells on Welfare and Off-welfare among Lone Mothers in Ontario," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 21, McMaster University.

Articles

  1. Chowhan, James & Stewart, Jennifer M., 2007. "Television and the behaviour of adolescents: Does socio-economic status moderate the link?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(7), pages 1324-1336, October.
  2. Martin Dooley & Ellen Lipman & Jennifer Stewart, 2005. "Exploring the Good Mother Hypothesis: Do Child Outcomes Vary with the Mother's Share of Income?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 31(2), pages 123-144, June.
  3. Martin Dooley & Jennifer Stewart, 2004. "Family income and child outcomes in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 898-917, November.
  4. Stewart, Jennifer M. & O'Shea, Eamon & Donaldson, Cam & Shackley, Phil, 2002. "Do ordering effects matter in willingness-to-pay studies of health care?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 585-599, July.
  5. Eamon O’Shea & Jennifer Stewart & Cam Donaldson & Phil Shackley, 2001. "Eliciting Preferences for Resource Allocation in Health Care," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 32(3), pages 217-238.
  6. Stewart, Jennifer M., 2001. "The impact of health status on the duration of unemployment spells and the implications for studies of the impact of unemployment on health status," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 781-796, September.
  7. Jennifer Stewart & Martin D. Dooley, 1999. "The Duration of Spells on Welfare and Off Welfare Among Lone Mothers in Ontario," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(s1), pages 47-72, November.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Jennifer Stewart & Eamon O'Shea & Cam Donaldson & Phil Shackley, 2000. "Do Ordering Effects Matter in Willingness-to-pay Studies of Health Care?," Working Papers 0046, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 2000.

    Cited by:

    1. Pinto-Prades, Jose Luis & Loomes, Graham & Brey, Raul, 2009. "Trying to estimate a monetary value for the QALY," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 553-562, May.
    2. Marco Haan & S. Dijkstra & Peter Dijkstra, 2005. "Expert Judgment Versus Public Opinion – Evidence from the Eurovision Song Contest," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 29(1), pages 59-78, February.
    3. Liu, Jin-Tan & Tsou, Meng-Wen & Hammitt, James K., 2009. "Willingness to pay for weight-control treatment," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 211-218, July.
    4. Ryan, Mandy & Scott, David A. & Donaldson, Cam, 2004. "Valuing health care using willingness to pay: a comparison of the payment card and dichotomous choice methods," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 237-258, March.
    5. R. Brau & G. Fiorentini & M. Lippi Bruni & AM. Pinna, 2003. "La disponibilità a pagare per la copertura del rischio di non autosufficienza: analisi econometrica e valutazioni di policy," Working Paper CRENoS 200305, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    6. Kevin Boyle & Semra Özdemir, 2009. "Convergent Validity of Attribute-Based, Choice Questions in Stated-Preference Studies," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 42(2), pages 247-264, February.
    7. Trine Kjær & Mickael Bech & Dorte Gyrd-Hansen & Kristian Hart-Hansen, 2006. "Ordering effect and price sensitivity in discrete choice experiments: need we worry?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(11), pages 1217-1228.
    8. van der Star, Sanne M. & van den Berg, Bernard, 2011. "Individual responsibility and health-risk behaviour: A contingent valuation study from the ex ante societal perspective," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 300-311, August.
    9. David Christafore & Susane Leguizamon, 2015. "Willingness to Pay for Hospital Access in Areas with High Concentrations of Blacks," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 45(1), pages 87-104, Spring.
    10. Mandy Ryan & Mabelle Amaya-Amaya, 2005. "' Threats ' to and hopes for estimating benefits," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 609-619.
    11. Evgeny A. Antipov & Elena B. Pokryshevskaya, 2017. "Order effects in the results of song contests: Evidence from the Eurovision and the New Wave," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 12(4), pages 415-419, July.
    12. Panos Pashardes & Nicoletta Pashourtidou, 2011. "Consumer welfare from publicly supplemented private goods: age and income effects on demand for health care," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 865-885, December.
    13. Richard D. Smith, 2008. "Contingent valuation in health care: does it matter how the 'good' is described?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 607-617.
    14. Jose Luis Pinto & Raul Brey & Graham Loomes, 2009. "Trying to estimate a monetary value for qualy," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2009/03, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    15. Liam Delaney & Francis O'Toole, 2004. "Irish public service broadcasting : a contingent valuation analysis," Open Access publications 10197/584, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    16. Brouwer, Roy & Bateman, Ian J., 2005. "Benefits transfer of willingness to pay estimates and functions for health-risk reductions: a cross-country study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 591-611, May.
    17. Leguizamon, Susane & Christafore, David, 2014. "Racial Differences in Willingness to Pay for Hospital Access," MPRA Paper 55926, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Tilling, C & Krol, M & Tsuchiya, A & Brazier, J & van Exel, J & Brouwer, W, 2009. "Measuring the value of life: exploring a new method for deriving the monetary value of a QALY," MPRA Paper 29911, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Whitehead, John C., 2005. "Combining willingness to pay and behavior data with limited information," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 143-155, June.
    20. Olsen, Jan Abel & Donaldson, Cam & Shackley, Phil, 2005. "Implicit versus explicit ranking: On inferring ordinal preferences for health care programmes based on differences in willingness-to-pay," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 990-996, September.
    21. Cai, Beilei & Cameron, Trudy Ann & Gerdes, Geoffrey R., 2011. "Distal order effects in stated preference surveys," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(6), pages 1101-1108, April.
    22. Konishi, Yoshifumi & Adachi, Kenji, 2011. "A framework for estimating willingness-to-pay to avoid endogenous environmental risks," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 130-154, January.
    23. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & van den Berg, Bernard, 2011. "Putting different price tags on the same health condition: Re-evaluating the well-being valuation approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1032-1043.
    24. O'Shea, Eamon & Gannon, Brenda & Kennelly, Brendan, 2008. "Eliciting preferences for resource allocation in mental health care in Ireland," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 88(2-3), pages 359-370, December.
    25. Awad Mataria & Stéphane Luchini & Yousef Daoud & Jean-Paul Moatti, 2007. "Demand assessment and price-elasticity estimation of quality-improved primary health care in palestine: a contribution from the contingent valuation method," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(10), pages 1051-1068.
    26. Eamon O’Shea & Jennifer Stewart & Cam Donaldson & Phil Shackley, 2001. "Eliciting Preferences for Resource Allocation in Health Care," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 32(3), pages 217-238.
    27. Annemieke De Ridder & Diana De Graeve, 2005. "Order bias in estimates of willingness to pay for drugs to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 6(2), pages 146-151, June.

  2. Jennifer Stewart, 1999. "The Impact of Health Status on the Duration of Unemployment Spells and the Implications for Studies of the Impact of Unemployment on Health Status," Working Papers 33, National University of Ireland Galway, Department of Economics, revised 1999.

    Cited by:

    1. Baris Yoruk, 2013. "Does giving to charity lead to better health? Evidence from tax subsidies for charitable giving," Discussion Papers 13-03, University at Albany, SUNY, Department of Economics.
    2. Kuhn, Michael & Ochsen, Carsten, 2009. "Demographic and geographic determinants of regional physician supply," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 105, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
    3. Binder, Martin & Coad, Alex, 2013. "“I'm afraid I have bad news for you…” Estimating the impact of different health impairments on subjective well-being," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 155-167.
    4. Martin Salm, 2009. "Does job loss cause ill health?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(9), pages 1075-1089.
    5. Martin Salm, 2008. "Job loss does not cause ill health," MEA discussion paper series 08163, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    6. Lundborg, Petter & Nilsson, Martin & Vikström, Johan, 2011. "Socioeconomic Heterogeneity in the Effect of Health Shocks on Earnings: Evidence from Population-Wide Data on Swedish Workers," IZA Discussion Papers 6121, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Donald S. Kenkel & Robert R. Reed III & Ping Wang, 2002. "Rational Addiction, Peer Externalities and Long Run Effects of Public Policy," NBER Working Papers 9249, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Schmitz, Hendrik, 2011. "Why are the unemployed in worse health? The causal effect of unemployment on health," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 71-78, January.
    9. Salm, Martin, 2007. "The Effect of Pensions on Longevity: Evidence from Union Army Veterans," IZA Discussion Papers 2668, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Douglas A. Webber & Michael T. French & Susan L. Ettner, 2015. "The Health Consequences of Adverse Labor Market Events: Evidence from Panel Data," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(3), pages 478-498, July.
    11. Lundin, Andreas & Hemmingsson, Tomas, 2013. "Adolescent predictors of unemployment and disability pension across the life course – a longitudinal study of selection in 49 321 Swedish men," Working Paper Series 2013:25, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    12. Urbanos-Garrido, Rosa M. & Gonzalez Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz, 2013. "Desempleo y salud: Un análisis de la repercusión de la crisis económica sobre la salud de los españoles/Unemployment and Health: An Analysis of the Impact of the Economic Crisis on the Health of the S," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 303-326, Septiembr.
    13. Andreas Kuhn & Rafael Lalive & Josef Zweim�ller, 2009. "The public health costs of job loss," IEW - Working Papers 424, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
    14. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2006. "Macroeconomic Conditions, Health and Mortality," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. García-Gómeza, P & Jones, A.M & Rice, N, 2008. "Health effects on labour market exits and entries," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 08/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    16. Irina Grafova, 2007. "Your Money or Your Life: Managing Health, Managing Money," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 285-303, June.
    17. Rosa Urbanos-Garrido & Beatriz Lopez-Valcarcel, 2015. "The influence of the economic crisis on the association between unemployment and health: an empirical analysis for Spain," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 16(2), pages 175-184, March.
    18. Garcy, Anthony M. & Vågerö, Denny, 2012. "The length of unemployment predicts mortality, differently in men and women, and by cause of death: A six year mortality follow-up of the Swedish 1992–1996 recession," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(12), pages 1911-1920.
    19. Sergi Jimenez-Martin & Jose M. Labeaga & Cristina Vilaplana Prieto, 2007. "Award errors and permanent disability benefits in Spain," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 07/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    20. Andreas KUHN & Rafael LALIVE & Josef ZWEIMÜLLER, 2007. "The Public Health Costs of Unemployment," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 07.08, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    21. Lídia Farré & Francesco Fasani & Hannes Mueller, 2015. "Feeling Useless: The Effect of Unemployment on Mental Health in the Great Recession," Working Papers 774, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    22. Namkee Ahn & Juan Ramón García & Juan F. Jimeno, "undated". "Well-being Consequences of Unemployment in Europe," Working Papers 2004-11, FEDEA.
    23. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Johannesson, Magnus, 2003. "A note on the effect of unemployment on mortality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 505-518, May.
    24. Reeves, Aaron & Karanikolos, Marina & Mackenbach, Johan & McKee, Martin & Stuckler, David, 2014. "Do employment protection policies reduce the relative disadvantage in the labour market experienced by unhealthy people? A natural experiment created by the Great Recession in Europe," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 98-108.
    25. Schiele, Valentin & Schmitz, Hendrik, 2016. "Quantile treatment effects of job loss on health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 59-69.
    26. Salm, M., 2009. "Does job loss cause ill health?," Other publications TiSEM 314436db-9957-4912-ba47-9, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.

  3. Jennifer Stewart & Martin Dooley, "undated". "The Duration of Spells on Welfare and Off-welfare among Lone Mothers in Ontario," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 21, McMaster University.

    Cited by:

    1. Lori J. Curtis & Kate Rybczynski, 2014. "Exiting Poverty: Does Sex Matter?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 40(2), pages 126-142, June.
    2. Kuan Xu & Lars Osberg, 1999. "Poverty Intensity - How Well Do Canadian Provinces Compare?," LIS Working papers 203, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    3. Louis Christofides, 1999. "Social Assistance and Labour Supply," CESifo Working Paper Series 225, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Finnie, Ross & Irvine, Ian & Sceviour, Roger, 2004. "La dynamique de l'aide sociale au Canada : le role des attributs individuels et des variables economiques et politiques," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2004231f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    5. Finnie, Ross & Irvine, Ian & Sceviour, Roger, 2004. "Welfare Dynamics in Canada: The Role of Individual Attributes and Economic-policy Variables," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2004231e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    6. Ayala, Luis & Rodriguez, Magdalena, 2007. "Barriers to employment and welfare dynamics: Evidence from Spain," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 237-257.
    7. Finnie, Ross & Irvine, Ian & Sceviour, Roger, 2005. "Social Assistance Use in Canada: National and Provincial Trends in Incidence, Entry and Exit," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2005245e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    8. Fortin, Bernard & Lacroix, Guy & Drolet, Simon, 2004. "Welfare benefits and the duration of welfare spells: evidence from a natural experiment in Canada," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1495-1520, July.
    9. Guy Lacroix & Gino Santarossa & Pierre Gagné, 2003. "Une analyse de la dynamique de la dépendance à l'assistance-emploi des populations natives et immigrantes québécoises," Cahiers de recherche 0342, CIRPEE.

Articles

  1. Chowhan, James & Stewart, Jennifer M., 2007. "Television and the behaviour of adolescents: Does socio-economic status moderate the link?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(7), pages 1324-1336, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Mößle & Sören Kliem & Florian Rehbein, 2014. "Longitudinal Effects of Violent Media Usage on Aggressive Behavior—The Significance of Empathy," Societies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(1), pages 1-20, February.

  2. Martin Dooley & Ellen Lipman & Jennifer Stewart, 2005. "Exploring the Good Mother Hypothesis: Do Child Outcomes Vary with the Mother's Share of Income?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 31(2), pages 123-144, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Dooley & Jennifer Stewart, 2007. "Family income, parenting styles and child behavioural-emotional outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 145-162.
    2. Lynda G. Gagné & Ana Ferrer, 2006. "Housing, Neighbourhoods and Development Outcomes of Children in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 32(3), pages 275-300, September.
    3. Frances Woolley, 2004. "Why Pay Child Benefits to Mothers?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 30(1), pages 47-69, March.
    4. Claire de Oliveira, 2009. "Good Health to All: Reducing Health Inequalities among Children in High- and Low-Income Canadian Families," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 288, May.

  3. Martin Dooley & Jennifer Stewart, 2004. "Family income and child outcomes in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 898-917, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Neil J Buckley & Frank T Denton & A Leslie Robb & Byron G Spencer, 2005. "Socioeconomic Influences on the Health of Older Canadians: Estimates Based on Two Longitudinal Surveys," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 139, McMaster University.
    2. Catherine Deri-Armstrong, 2009. "The Long-term Effects of Maternal Employment on Daughters’ Later Labour Force Participation and Earnings," Working Papers 0914E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    3. Pierre Lefebvre & Philip Merrigan, 2005. "Low-fee ($5/day/child) Regulated Childcare Policy and the Labor Supply of Mothers with Young Children: A Natural Experiment from Canada / La politique des services de garde à 5 $/jour et l'offre de tr," CIRANO Working Papers 2005s-08, CIRANO.
    4. Del Boca, Daniela & Flinn, Christopher & Wiswall, Matthew, 2010. "Household Choices and Child Development," IZA Discussion Papers 5155, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Contoyannis, Paul & Li, Jinhu, 2011. "The evolution of health outcomes from childhood to adolescence," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 11-32, January.
    6. Milligan, Kevin & Stabile, Mark, 2010. "Do child tax benefits affect the wellbeing of children? evidence from Canadian child benefit expansions," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58059, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Martin Dooley & Ellen Lipman & Jennifer Stewart, 2005. "Exploring the Good Mother Hypothesis: Do Child Outcomes Vary with the Mother's Share of Income?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 31(2), pages 123-144, June.
    8. Lynda G. Gagné & Ana Ferrer, 2006. "Housing, Neighbourhoods and Development Outcomes of Children in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 32(3), pages 275-300, September.
    9. Chowhan, James & Stewart, Jennifer M., 2007. "Television and the behaviour of adolescents: Does socio-economic status moderate the link?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(7), pages 1324-1336, October.
    10. Kelly Chen & Lars Osberg & Shelley Phipps, 2015. "Inter-generational effects of disability benefits: evidence from Canadian social assistance programs," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 873-910, October.
    11. Løken, Katrine Vellesen & Mogstad, Magne & Wiswall, Matthew, 2011. "What Linear Estimators Miss: The E ects of Family Income on Child Outcomes," Working Papers in Economics 02/11, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    12. Lethbridge, Lynn & Phipps , Shelley, 2006. "Income and the Outcomes of Children," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2006281e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
    13. Randall Akee & Emilia Simeonova & E. Jane Costello & William Copeland, 2015. "How Does Household Income Affect Child Personality Traits and Behaviors?," NBER Working Papers 21562, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Laëtitia Lebihan & Charles Olivier Mao Takongmo, 2015. "Academic achievement trajectories and risk factors during early childhood," CIRANO Working Papers 2015s-47, CIRANO.

  4. Stewart, Jennifer M. & O'Shea, Eamon & Donaldson, Cam & Shackley, Phil, 2002. "Do ordering effects matter in willingness-to-pay studies of health care?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 585-599, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Eamon O’Shea & Jennifer Stewart & Cam Donaldson & Phil Shackley, 2001. "Eliciting Preferences for Resource Allocation in Health Care," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 32(3), pages 217-238.

    Cited by:

    1. Callan, Aoife & O'Shea, Eamon, 2015. "Willingness to pay for telecare programmes to support independent living: Results from a contingent valuation study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 94-102.
    2. Brouwer, Roy & Bateman, Ian J., 2005. "Benefits transfer of willingness to pay estimates and functions for health-risk reductions: a cross-country study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 591-611, May.
    3. Leguizamon, Susane & Christafore, David, 2014. "Racial Differences in Willingness to Pay for Hospital Access," MPRA Paper 55926, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. O'Shea, Eamon & Gannon, Brenda & Kennelly, Brendan, 2008. "Eliciting preferences for resource allocation in mental health care in Ireland," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 88(2-3), pages 359-370, December.

  6. Stewart, Jennifer M., 2001. "The impact of health status on the duration of unemployment spells and the implications for studies of the impact of unemployment on health status," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 781-796, September.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Jennifer Stewart & Martin D. Dooley, 1999. "The Duration of Spells on Welfare and Off Welfare Among Lone Mothers in Ontario," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 25(s1), pages 47-72, November. See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 1999-01-25

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