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Do ordering effects matter in willingness-to-pay studies of health care?

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  • Stewart, Jennifer M.
  • O'Shea, Eamon
  • Donaldson, Cam
  • Shackley, Phil

Abstract

Willingness-to-pay studies are increasingly being used in the evaluation of health care programmes. There are, however, methodological issues that need to be resolved before the potential of willingness-to-pay can be fully exploited as a tool for the economic evaluation of health care programmes. Of particular methodological interest are the consequences of varying the order in which willingness-to-pay questions are presented to respondents in contingent valuation studies. This paper examines the possibility of ordering effects in willingness-to-pay studies in health care. That is, when simultaneously asking willingness-to-pay questions about three health care programmes, does the order the programmes are presented have an impact on the reported willingness-to-pay? We present the results from a survey which allowed us to test for ordering effects and examine, in particular, if the respondent?s past experience with the health care service interacted with the ordering effects.
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Suggested Citation

  • Stewart, Jennifer M. & O'Shea, Eamon & Donaldson, Cam & Shackley, Phil, 2002. "Do ordering effects matter in willingness-to-pay studies of health care?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 585-599, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:21:y:2002:i:4:p:585-599
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    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis

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