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Willingness-to-Pay and Demand Curves: A Comparison of Results Obtained Using Different Elicitation Formats

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  • David Whynes
  • Emma Frew
  • Jane Wolstenholme

Abstract

Health economists use “willingness-to-pay” to assess the prospective value of novel interventions. The technique remains controversial, not least with respect to the formats under which values are elicited. The paper analyses the results of a series of studies of the same intervention valued by the same population, in which different elicitation formats were employed. The findings support the hypothesis that data collected using different formats give rise to different demand curves, from which different inferences about demand elasticity, profitability and consumer surplus will be derived. Judgements as to the relative merits of rival interventions depend crucially upon whichever format has been used to evaluate each intervention. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • David Whynes & Emma Frew & Jane Wolstenholme, 2005. "Willingness-to-Pay and Demand Curves: A Comparison of Results Obtained Using Different Elicitation Formats," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 369-386, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ijhcfe:v:5:y:2005:i:4:p:369-386
    DOI: 10.1007/s10754-005-4014-2
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    2. Petra Baji & Milena Pavlova & László Gulácsi & Miklós Farkas & Wim Groot, 2014. "The link between past informal payments and willingness of the Hungarian population to pay formal fees for health care services: results from a contingent valuation study," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(8), pages 853-867, November.
    3. Liu, Ariane & Giurco, Damien & Mukheibir, Pierre, 2015. "Motivating metrics for household water-use feedback," Resources, Conservation & Recycling, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 29-46.
    4. Nguyen, Ha & Knowles, James, 2010. "Demand for voluntary health insurance in developing countries: The case of Vietnam's school-age children and adolescent student health insurance program," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(12), pages 2074-2082, December.

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