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Willingness to pay methods in health care: a sceptical view


  • Richard Cookson

    (Health Economics, Law and Ethics Group, School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice, University of East Anglia, U.K.)


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Cookson, 2003. "Willingness to pay methods in health care: a sceptical view," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(11), pages 891-894.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:12:y:2003:i:11:p:891-894 DOI: 10.1002/hec.847

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bateman, Ian J, et al, 1997. "Does Part-Whole Bias Exist? An Experimental Investigation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(441), pages 322-332, March.
    2. Nick Hanley & Mandy Ryan & Robert Wright, 2003. "Estimating the monetary value of health care: lessons from environmental economics," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(1), pages 3-16.
    3. Kahneman, Daniel & Knetsch, Jack L., 1992. "Valuing public goods: The purchase of moral satisfaction," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 57-70, January.
    4. Drummond, Michael & McGuire, Alistair (ed.), 2001. "Economic Evaluation in Health Care: Merging theory with practice," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780192631763.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hiselius, Lena Winslott, 2005. "Preferences regarding road transports of hazardous materials using choice experiments - any sign of biases?," Working Papers 2005:30, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    2. David Whynes & Emma Frew & Jane Wolstenholme, 2005. "Willingness-to-Pay and Demand Curves: A Comparison of Results Obtained Using Different Elicitation Formats," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 5(4), pages 369-386, December.
    3. Richard Cookson, 2005. "QALYs and the capability approach," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(8), pages 817-829.
    4. Zoë Philips & David K. Whynes & Mark Avis, 2006. "Testing the construct validity of willingness to pay valuations using objective information about risk and health benefit," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(2), pages 195-204.
    5. Sandy Tubeuf & Thomas A. Willis & Barbara Potrata & Hilary Grant & Matthew J. Allsop & Mushtaq Ahmed & Jenny Hewison & Martin McKibbin, 2013. "Willingness-to-pay for genetic testing for inherited retinal disease," Working Papers 1309, Academic Unit of Health Economics, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds.
    6. Fimpel, Julia & Stolpe, Michael, 2006. "The welfare costs of HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe: An empirical assessment using the economic value-of-life approach," Kiel Working Papers 1297, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    7. Hackl, Franz & Pruckner, Gerald Josef, 2006. "Demand and supply of emergency help: An economic analysis of Red Cross services," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 326-338, August.
    8. Richard D. Smith & Tracey H. Sach, 2009. "Contingent valuation: (still) on the road to nowhere?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 863-866.
    9. repec:eee:socmed:v:183:y:2017:i:c:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Geneau, Robert & Massae, Patrick & Courtright, Paul & Lewallen, Susan, 2008. "Using qualitative methods to understand the determinants of patients' willingness to pay for cataract surgery: A study in Tanzania," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 558-568, February.
    11. Dror, David Mark & Radermacher, Ralf & Koren, Ruth, 2007. "Willingness to pay for health insurance among rural and poor persons: Field evidence from seven micro health insurance units in India," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 12-27, June.
    12. David K. Whynes & Zoë Philips & Emma Frew, 2005. "Think of a number… any number?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(11), pages 1191-1195.
    13. Shiell, Alan & Sperber, Daniel & Porat, Carly, 2009. "Do taboo trade-offs explain the difficulty in valuing health and social interventions?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 935-939, December.

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