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Should we use willingness to pay to elicit community preferences for health care?: New evidence from using a 'marginal' approach

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  • Shackley, Phil
  • Donaldson, Cam

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  • Shackley, Phil & Donaldson, Cam, 2002. "Should we use willingness to pay to elicit community preferences for health care?: New evidence from using a 'marginal' approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 971-991, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:21:y:2002:i:6:p:971-991
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    1. Johannesson, Magnus & Jonsson, Bengt & Borgquist, Lars, 1991. "Willingness to pay for antihypertensive therapy -- results of a Swedish pilot study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 461-473.
    2. Gyldmark, Marlene & Morrison, Gwendolyn C., 2001. "Demand for health care in Denmark: results of a national sample survey using contingent valuation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 1023-1036, October.
    3. Schkade David A. & Payne John W., 1994. "How People Respond to Contingent Valuation Questions: A Verbal Protocol Analysis of Willingness to Pay for an Environmental Regulation," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 88-109, January.
    4. Cam Donaldson & Phil Shackley & Mona Abdalla, 1997. "Using Willingness To Pay To Value Close Substitutes: Carrier Screening for Cystic Fibrosis Revisited," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(2), pages 145-159.
    5. Kahneman, Daniel & Tversky, Amos, 1979. "Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(2), pages 263-291, March.
    6. Ryan, Mandy, 1998. "Valuing psychological factors in the provision of assisted reproductive techniques using the economic instrument of willingness to pay," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 179-204, April.
    7. Bishai, David M. & Lang, Hui Chu, 2000. "The willingness to pay for wait reduction: the disutility of queues for cataract surgery in Canada, Denmark, and Spain," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 219-230, March.
    8. Kahneman, Daniel & Knetsch, Jack L., 1992. "Valuing public goods: The purchase of moral satisfaction," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 57-70, January.
    9. Cam Donaldson & Phil Shackley & Mona Abdalla & Zosia Miedzybrodzka, 1995. "Willingness to pay for antenatal carrier screening for cystic fibrosis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 4(6), pages 439-452, November.
    10. Klose, Thomas, 1999. "The contingent valuation method in health care," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 97-123, May.
    11. Chiu, Lian & Tang, Kwong-Yui & Shyu, Woei-Cherng & Chang, Ta-Pang, 1999. "The willingness of families caring for victims of stroke to pay for in-home respite care--results of a pilot study in Taiwan," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 239-254, March.
    12. Lee, Stephanie J. & Neumann, Peter J. & Churchill, W. Hallowell & Cannon, Marie E. & Weinstein, Milton C. & Johannesson, Magnus, 1997. "Patients' willingness to pay for autologous blood donation," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 1-12, April.
    13. Cam Donaldson & Ruth Thomas & David Torgerson, 1997. "Validity of open-ended and payment scale approaches to eliciting willingness to pay," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(1), pages 79-84.
    14. Alan Diener & Bernie O'Brien & Amiram Gafni, 1998. "Health care contingent valuation studies: a review and classification of the literature," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(4), pages 313-326.
    15. Niklas Zethraeus, 1998. "Willingness to pay for hormone replacement therapy," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(1), pages 31-38.
    16. Chapman, Gretchen B. & Johnson, Eric J., 1995. "Preference Reversals in Monetary and Life Expectancy Evaluations," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 62(3), pages 300-317, June.
    17. Ryan, Mandy & Ratcliffe, Julie & Tucker, Janet, 1997. "Using willingness to pay to value alternative models of antenatal care," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 371-380, February.
    18. Jan Abel Olsen, 1997. "Aiding priority setting in health care: is there a role for the contingent valuation method?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(6), pages 603-612.
    19. Schoemaker, Paul J H, 1982. "The Expected Utility Model: Its Variants, Purposes, Evidence and Limitations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 20(2), pages 529-563, June.
    20. Olsen, Jan Abel & Donaldson, Cam, 1998. "Helicopters, hearts and hips: Using willingness to pay to set priorities for public sector health care programmes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 1-12, January.
    21. Phil Shackley & Simon Dixon, 2000. "Using contingent valuation to elicit public preferences for water fluoridation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(6), pages 777-787.
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    Cited by:

    1. Karine Lamiraud & Robert Oxoby & Cam Donaldson, 2016. "Incremental willingness to pay: a theoretical and empirical exposition," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 80(1), pages 101-123, January.
    2. Joan Costa-Font & Joan Rovira, 2005. "Eliciting preferences for collectively financed health programmes: the 'willingness to assign' approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(14), pages 1571-1583.
    3. Waibel, Hermann & Garming, Hildegard, 2007. "Pesticides And Farmer Health In Nicaragua: A Willingness To Pay Approach," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Göttingen 2007 7, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    4. Borghi, Josephine & Shrestha, Daya L. & Shrestha, Deepa & Jan, Stephen, 2007. "Using focus groups to develop contingent valuation scenarios--A case study of women's groups in rural Nepal," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(3), pages 531-542, February.
    5. Costa -Font, Joan & Forns, Joan Rovira & Sato, Azusa, 2015. "Participatory health system priority setting: Evidence from a budget experiment," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 182-190.
    6. Rinaldo Brau & Gianluca Fiorentini & Matteo Lippi Bruni & Anna Maria Pinna, 2004. "La disponibilità a pagare per la copertura del rischio di non autosufficienza: analisi econometrica e valutazioni di "policy"," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 3, pages 357-388.
    7. van der Star, Sanne M. & van den Berg, Bernard, 2011. "Individual responsibility and health-risk behaviour: A contingent valuation study from the ex ante societal perspective," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 300-311, August.
    8. George Houtven & Melonie Sullivan & Chris Dockins, 2008. "Cancer premiums and latency effects: A risk tradeoff approach for valuing reductions in fatal cancer risks," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 179-199, April.
    9. Ram Ranjan & Jason F. Shogren, 2009. "Dynamic Endogenous Risks & Non-Expected Utility Behavior," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 25, pages 215-240.
    10. R. Brau & M. Lippi Bruni & AM. Pinna, 2004. "Public vs private demand for covering long term care expenditures," Working Paper CRENoS 200408, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
    11. Rinaldo Brau & Matteo Lippi Bruni & Anna Maria Pinna, 2010. "Public versus private demand for covering long-term care expenditures," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(28), pages 3651-3668.
    12. Callan, Aoife & O'Shea, Eamon, 2015. "Willingness to pay for telecare programmes to support independent living: Results from a contingent valuation study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 94-102.
    13. Leguizamon, Susane & Christafore, David, 2014. "Racial Differences in Willingness to Pay for Hospital Access," MPRA Paper 55926, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Karine Lamiraud & Robert Oxoby & Cam Donaldson, 2015. "Incremental willingness to pay," Working Papers hal-01205938, HAL.
    15. Lamiraud, Karine & Oxoby, Robert & Donaldson, Cam, 2016. "Reference Dependence and Incremental WTP," ESSEC Working Papers WP1609, ESSEC Research Center, ESSEC Business School.
    16. Oliver, Adam, 2013. "Testing the rate of preference reversal in personal and social decision-making," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1250-1257.
    17. Garming, Hildegard & Waibel, Hermann, 2006. "Willingness To Pay To Avoid Health Risks From Pesticides, A Case Study From Nicaragua," 46th Annual Conference, Giessen, Germany, October 4-6, 2006 14968, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    18. Annemieke De Ridder & Diana De Graeve, 2005. "Order bias in estimates of willingness to pay for drugs to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 6(2), pages 146-151, June.
    19. Hildegard Garming & Hermann Waibel, 2009. "Pesticides and farmer health in Nicaragua: a willingness-to-pay approach to evaluation," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 10(2), pages 125-133, May.

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