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Demand for health care in Denmark: results of a national sample survey using contingent valuation

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  • Gyldmark, Marlene
  • Morrison, Gwendolyn C.

Abstract

In this paper we use willingness to pay (WTP) to elicit values for private insurance covering treatment for four different health problems. By way of obtaining these values, we test the viability of the contingent valuation method (CVM) and econometric techniques, respectively, as means of eliciting and analysing values from the general public. WTP responses from a Danish national sample survey, which was designed in accordance with existing guidelines, are analysed in terms of consistency and validity checks. Large numbers of zero responses are common in WTP studies, and are found here; therefore, the Heckman selectivity model and log-transformed OLS are employed. The selectivity model is rejected, but test results indicate that the lognormal model yields efficient and unbiased estimates. The results give confidence in the WTP estimates obtained and, more generally, in CVM as a means of valuing publicly provided goods and in econometrics as a tool for analysing WTP results containing many zero responses.

Suggested Citation

  • Gyldmark, Marlene & Morrison, Gwendolyn C., 2001. "Demand for health care in Denmark: results of a national sample survey using contingent valuation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 53(8), pages 1023-1036, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:53:y:2001:i:8:p:1023-1036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Deininger, Klaus & Squire, Lyn, 1996. "A New Data Set Measuring Income Inequality," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 10(3), pages 565-591, September.
    2. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
    3. Godfrey, Leslie G & McAleer, Michael & McKenzie, Colin R, 1988. "Variable Addition and LaGrange Multiplier Tests for Linear and Logarithmic Regression Models," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(3), pages 492-503, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Shackley, Phil & Donaldson, Cam, 2002. "Should we use willingness to pay to elicit community preferences for health care?: New evidence from using a 'marginal' approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(6), pages 971-991, November.
    2. repec:spr:pharme:v:35:y:2017:i:8:d:10.1007_s40273-017-0511-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Till Seuring & Olga Archangelidi & Marc Suhrcke, 2015. "The Economic Costs of Type 2 Diabetes: A Global Systematic Review," PharmacoEconomics, Springer, vol. 33(8), pages 811-831, August.
    4. Mandy Ryan & Mabelle Amaya-Amaya, 2005. "' Threats ' to and hopes for estimating benefits," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 609-619.
    5. Oliver, Adam, 2013. "Testing the rate of preference reversal in personal and social decision-making," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1250-1257.
    6. George Houtven & Melonie Sullivan & Chris Dockins, 2008. "Cancer premiums and latency effects: A risk tradeoff approach for valuing reductions in fatal cancer risks," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 179-199, April.
    7. Awad Mataria & St├ęphane Luchini & Yousef Daoud & Jean-Paul Moatti, 2007. "Demand assessment and price-elasticity estimation of quality-improved primary health care in palestine: a contribution from the contingent valuation method," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(10), pages 1051-1068.
    8. Mataria, Awad & Donaldson, Cam & Luchini, Stephane & Moatti, Jean-Paul, 2004. "A stated preference approach to assessing health care-quality improvements in Palestine: from theoretical validity to policy implications," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1285-1311, November.

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