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Housing, Neighbourhoods and Development Outcomes of Children in Canada

  • Lynda G. Gagné
  • Ana Ferrer

We use data from Cycles 1 to 3 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to examine whether and how much housing and neighbourhood quality affect child outcomes. Home ownership, housing assistance, the need for major repairs, residential stability, underhousing, and neighbourhood quality are used as explanatory variables in population-averaged panel data and endogenous treatment models to estimate the impact of these variables on child cognitive, behavioural, and emotional outcomes. We find positive impacts of home ownership on reading scores, and positive impacts of housing subsidies on boys' behavioural scores, but negative impacts of subsidies on girls' emotional scores after controlling for other factors. Both girls and boys fare worse in housing requiring major repairs, but boys are negatively affected by housing instability, while girls are negatively affected by poor neighbourhood quality.

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Article provided by University of Toronto Press in its journal Canadian Public Policy.

Volume (Year): 32 (2006)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 275-300

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Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:32:y:2006:i:3:p:275-300
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  1. Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey B. Liebman & Lawrence F. Katz, 2005. "Experimental Analysis of Neighborhood Effects," NBER Working Papers 11577, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Janet Currie & Aaron Yelowitz, 1997. "Are Public Housing Projects Good for Kids?," NBER Working Papers 6305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  4. Boehm, Thomas P. & Schlottmann, Alan M., 1999. "Does Home Ownership by Parents Have an Economic Impact on Their Children?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 217-232, September.
  5. Daniel Aaronson, 1999. "A note on the benefits of homeownership," Working Paper Series WP-99-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  6. Martin Dooley & Jennifer Stewart, 2004. "Family income and child outcomes in Canada," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 898-917, November.
  7. Peter Burton & Shelley Phipps & Lori Curtis, 2002. "All in the Family: A Simultaneous Model of Parenting Style and Child Conduct," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 368-372, May.
  8. Brian A. Jacob, 2004. "Public Housing, Housing Vouchers, and Student Achievement: Evidence from Public Housing Demolitions in Chicago," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 233-258, March.
  9. Martin Dooley & Ellen Lipman & Jennifer Stewart, 2005. "Exploring the Good Mother Hypothesis: Do Child Outcomes Vary with the Mother's Share of Income?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 31(2), pages 123-144, June.
  10. Richard K. Green & Michelle J. White, 1994. "Measuring the Benefits of Homeowning: Effects on Children," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 93, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  11. Hanushek, Eric A, 1992. "The Trade-Off between Child Quantity and Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 84-117, February.
  12. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
  13. Anders Skrondal & Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, 2007. "Latent Variable Modelling: A Survey," Scandinavian Journal of Statistics, Danish Society for Theoretical Statistics;Finnish Statistical Society;Norwegian Statistical Association;Swedish Statistical Association, vol. 34(4), pages 712-745.
  14. John Goering, 2003. "The impacts of new neighborhoods on poor families: evaluating the policy implications of the moving to opportunity demonstration," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jun, pages 113-140.
  15. Newman, Sandra & Harkness, Joseph, 2000. "Assisted Housing and the Educational Attainment of Children," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1-2), pages 40-63, March.
  16. Martin Dooley & Jennifer Stewart, 2007. "Family income, parenting styles and child behavioural-emotional outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 145-162.
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