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The impact of low- and moderate-wealth homeownership on parental attitudes and behavior: Evidence from the community advantage panel

  • Grinstein-Weiss, Michal
  • Greeson, Johanna K.P.
  • Yeo, Yeong H.
  • Birdsong, Susanna S.
  • Despard, Mathieu R.
  • Quercia, Roberto G.
Registered author(s):

    Considerable research has suggested that homeownership imparts a variety of positive individual, family, neighborhood, and community effects. Yet, much of the research to date has failed to examine such effects by level of income [Dietz, R.D., & Haurin, D.R. (2003). The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership. Journal of Urban Economics, 54(3), 401-450.]. This study adds to the limited research on the impact of assets on parental attitude and behavior among low- and moderate-income (LMI) families. Data used in this study are from the evaluation of Self-Help's Community Advantage Home Loan Secondary Market Program. Specifically, we focus on the differences in the demographic and financial backgrounds, and parental attitudes and behavior between LMI homeowners and a comparison group of renters (n = 815 owners; n = 333 renters). Logistic regression analyses are used to model parental attitude and behavior outcomes on tenure, controlling for a variety of household characteristics. Results show that the overall differences between homeowners and renters on parental outcomes are statistically nonsignificant. This finding implies that tenure per se is not associated with parental attitudes and behavior. Explanations for the possible reasons for the lack of a tenure effect are discussed. Policy implications are forwarded.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Children and Youth Services Review.

    Volume (Year): 31 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 23-31

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:31:y:2009:i:1:p:23-31
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/childyouth

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    1. Denise DiPasquale & Edward L. Glaeser, 1998. "Incentives and Social Capital: Are Homeowners Better Citizens?," NBER Working Papers 6363, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Henderson, J Vernon & Ioannides, Yannis M, 1983. "A Model of Housing Tenure Choice," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 98-113, March.
    3. Skinner, Jonathan, 1989. "Housing wealth and aggregate saving," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 305-324, May.
    4. Boehm, Thomas P. & Schlottmann, Alan M., 1999. "Does Home Ownership by Parents Have an Economic Impact on Their Children?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 217-232, September.
    5. Richard K. Green & Michelle J. White, 1994. "Measuring the Benefits of Homeowning: Effects on Children," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 94-05, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
    6. Eliana Garces & Duncan Thomas & Janet Currie, 2000. "Longer Term Effects of Head Start," NBER Working Papers 8054, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Roberto G. Quercia & George W. McCarthy & Susan M. Wachter, . "The Impacts Of Affordable Lending Efforts On Homeownership Rates," Zell/Lurie Center Working Papers 405, Wharton School Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center, University of Pennsylvania.
    8. Lynda G. Gagné & Ana Ferrer, 2006. "Housing, Neighbourhoods and Development Outcomes of Children in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 32(3), pages 275-300, September.
    9. Donald R. Haurin & Toby L. Parcel & R. Jean Haurin, 2002. "Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 635-666.
    10. Zhan, Min, 2006. "Assets, parental expectations and involvement, and children's educational performance," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(8), pages 961-975, August.
    11. Aaronson, Daniel, 2000. "A Note on the Benefits of Homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 356-369, May.
    12. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
    13. Haurin, Donald R. & Gill, H. Leroy, 2002. "The Impact of Transaction Costs and the Expected Length of Stay on Homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 563-584, May.
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