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Housing and child development

Author

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  • Leventhal, Tama
  • Newman, Sandra

Abstract

This article presents a critical review of recent research on the role of housing in children's development, including physical health; social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes; and schooling, achievement, and economic attainment. We focus on six features of housing that are central to housing policy and have generally received the most research attention: (1) physical housing quality; (2) crowding; (3) residential mobility; (4) homeownership; (5) subsidized housing; and (6) unaffordability. The strongest evidence is provided for the deleterious associations between environmental toxins/hazards and crowding with children's health, and for residential mobility with children's short-term academic, social and emotional problems. The findings on assisted housing are mixed, and homeownership and affordability are not linked to children's outcomes. More methodologically rigorous and conceptually focused research is needed. Despite fundamental knowledge gaps, the results have implications for housing policies focused on homeownership, subsidies and land use regulations.

Suggested Citation

  • Leventhal, Tama & Newman, Sandra, 2010. "Housing and child development," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1165-1174, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:cysrev:v:32:y:2010:i:9:p:1165-1174
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:demogr:v:55:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s13524-018-0652-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Brian Jacob & Max Kapustin & Jens Ludwig, 2014. "Human Capital Effects of Anti-Poverty Programs: Evidence from a Randomized Housing Voucher Lottery," NBER Working Papers 20164, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. repec:kap:poprpr:v:36:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s11113-017-9431-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:zbw:espost:167629 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:eur:ejisjr:242 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Lizabeth Malone & Ashley Kopack Klein & Nikki Aikens & Jessica F. Harding & Jerry West & Louisa Tarullo, "undated". "Head Start Family and Classroom Supports for Kindergarten Achievement: FACES 2009," Mathematica Policy Research Reports aa0e69661044425eae329bbdc, Mathematica Policy Research.
    7. Coulton, Claudia J. & Richter, Francisca & Kim, Seok-Joo & Fischer, Robert & Cho, Youngmin, 2016. "Temporal effects of distressed housing on early childhood risk factors and kindergarten readiness," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 59-72.
    8. repec:eee:cysrev:v:77:y:2017:i:c:p:101-109 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Kull, Melissa A. & Coley, Rebekah Levine, 2014. "Housing costs and child functioning: Processes through investments and financial strains," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 25-38.
    10. Lewis, Melinda & Cramer, Reid & Elliott, William & Sprague, Aleta, 2014. "Policies to promote economic stability, asset building, and child development," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 15-21.
    11. Darlington Mushongera & Precious Zikhali & Phindile Ngwenya, 2017. "A Multidimensional Poverty Index for Gauteng Province, South Africa: Evidence from Quality of Life Survey Data," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 130(1), pages 277-303, January.
    12. Leonard M. Lopoo & Andrew S. London, 2016. "Household Crowding During Childhood and Long-Term Education Outcomes," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 699-721, June.
    13. Natasha Pilkauskas & Katherine Michelmore, 2017. "Does the Earned Income Tax Credit Reduce Housing Instability?," Working Papers wp18-01-ff, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..

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