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New evidence on the link between housing environment and children's educational attainments

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  • Lien, Hsien-Ming
  • Wu, Wen-Chieh
  • Lin, Chu-Chia

Abstract

There is extensive literature that posits the hypothesis that a better housing environment enhances a child's educational attainment. However, there is little causal evidence demonstrating the presence of this effect. In this study, we examine the effect of housing environment on a child's educational attainment using census files covering the entire population of Taiwan. Because the Taiwan census data contains unique address information for every household, we try to control the neighborhood effect and unobserved family heterogeneity by comparing a child with his peers of the same age cohort in the same neighborhood. After accounting for tens of thousand area dummies, the chance of high school enrollment for teens (aged 16 and 17) and college enrollment for young adults (aged 19 and 20) is found to be positively correlated with an increase in floor space, an increase in residential stability and with homeownership, but negatively correlated to an increase in housing crowdedness and an increase in building age. Among these housing variables, residential stability and homeownership are the ones generating the largest positive effects on the child's schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Lien, Hsien-Ming & Wu, Wen-Chieh & Lin, Chu-Chia, 2008. "New evidence on the link between housing environment and children's educational attainments," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 408-421, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:64:y:2008:i:2:p:408-421
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cooper, Daniel & Luengo-Prado, María José, 2015. "House price growth when children are teenagers: A path to higher earnings?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 54-72.
    2. Ling Hin Li, 2016. "Impacts of Homeownership and Residential Stability on Children’s Academic Performance in Hong Kong," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(2), pages 595-616, March.
    3. Tumen, Semih, 2012. "Fertility decisions and endogenous residential sorting," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 78-87.
    4. Tan, Teck Hong & Khong, Kok Wei, 2012. "The Link between Homeownership Motivation and Housing Satisfaction," MPRA Paper 46890, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Jie Chen, 2013. "Housing tenure, residential mobility and adolescents’ education achievement: evidence from Sweden," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(1), pages 275-294, February.
    6. Stephen Whelan, 2017. "Does homeownership affect education outcomes?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 342-342, April.

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