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New evidence on the link between housing environment and children's educational attainments

Listed author(s):
  • Lien, Hsien-Ming
  • Wu, Wen-Chieh
  • Lin, Chu-Chia

There is extensive literature that posits the hypothesis that a better housing environment enhances a child's educational attainment. However, there is little causal evidence demonstrating the presence of this effect. In this study, we examine the effect of housing environment on a child's educational attainment using census files covering the entire population of Taiwan. Because the Taiwan census data contains unique address information for every household, we try to control the neighborhood effect and unobserved family heterogeneity by comparing a child with his peers of the same age cohort in the same neighborhood. After accounting for tens of thousand area dummies, the chance of high school enrollment for teens (aged 16 and 17) and college enrollment for young adults (aged 19 and 20) is found to be positively correlated with an increase in floor space, an increase in residential stability and with homeownership, but negatively correlated to an increase in housing crowdedness and an increase in building age. Among these housing variables, residential stability and homeownership are the ones generating the largest positive effects on the child's schooling.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0094-1190(08)00021-1
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Urban Economics.

Volume (Year): 64 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (September)
Pages: 408-421

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Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:64:y:2008:i:2:p:408-421
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622905

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  1. Angrist, Joshua & Lavy, Victor & Schlosser, Analia, 2006. "New Evidence on the Causal Link between the Quantity and Quality of Children," CEPR Discussion Papers 5668, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Richard K. Green & Michelle J. White, 1994. "Measuring the Benefits of Homeowning: Effects on Children," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 93, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
  3. Daniel Aaronson, 1999. "A note on the benefits of homeownership," Working Paper Series WP-99-23, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  4. Boehm, Thomas P. & Schlottmann, Alan M., 1999. "Does Home Ownership by Parents Have an Economic Impact on Their Children?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 217-232, September.
  5. Donald R. Haurin & Toby L. Parcel & R. Jean Haurin, 2002. "Does Homeownership Affect Child Outcomes?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 30(4), pages 635-666.
  6. Joseph M. Harkness & Sandra J. Newman, 2003. "Effects of homeownership on children: the role of neighborhood characteristics and family income," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jun, pages 87-107.
  7. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1976. "Child Endowments and the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 143-162, August.
  8. Daniel Aaronson, "undated". "Using Sibling Data to Estimate the Impact of Neighborhoods on Children's Educational Outcomes," IPR working papers 95-20, Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University.
  9. Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric, 2003. "The Effects of Overcrowded Housing on Children's Performance at School," CEPR Discussion Papers 3818, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 279-288, Part II, .
  11. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
  12. Nan Astone & Sara McLanahan, 1994. "Family structure, residential mobility, and school dropout: A research note," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 31(4), pages 575-584, November.
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