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Public Housing, Housing Vouchers, and Student Achievement: Evidence from Public Housing Demolitions in Chicago

  • Brian A. Jacob
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    This paper utilizes a plausibly exogenous source of variation in housing assistance generated by public housing demolitions in Chicago to examine the impact of high-rise public housing on student outcomes. I find that children in households affected by the demolitions do no better or worse than their peers on a wide variety of achievement measures. Because the majority of households that leave high-rise public housing in response to the demolitions move to neighborhoods and schools that closely resemble those they left, the zero effect of the demolitions may be interpreted as the independent impact of public housing.

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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/000282804322970788
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    Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): 94 (2004)
    Issue (Month): 1 (March)
    Pages: 233-258

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    Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:94:y:2004:i:1:p:233-258
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282804322970788
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    1. J. Currie & A. Yelowitz, . "Are Public Housing Projects Good For Kids?," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1152-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    2. Lawrence F. Katz & Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey B. Liebman, 2001. "Moving To Opportunity In Boston: Early Results Of A Randomized Mobility Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(2), pages 607-654, May.
    3. David A. Reingold & Gregg G. Van Ryzin & Michelle Ronda, 2001. "Does Urban Public Housing Diminish the Social Capital and Labor Force Activity of Its Tenants?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 485-504.
    4. Philip Oreopoulos, 2003. "The Long-Run Consequences Of Living In A Poor Neighborhood," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(4), pages 1533-1575, November.
    5. Jens Ludwig & Greg J. Duncan & Paul Hirschfield, 2001. "Urban Poverty And Juvenile Crime: Evidence From A Randomized Housing-Mobility Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 116(2), pages 655-679, May.
    6. Hanushek, Eric A, 1986. "The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1141-77, September.
    7. Newman, Sandra & Harkness, Joseph, 2000. "Assisted Housing and the Educational Attainment of Children," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(1-2), pages 40-63, March.
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