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Parents’ responses to teacher qualifications

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  • Chang, Simon
  • Cobb-Clark, Deborah A.
  • Salamanca, Nicolás

Abstract

We identify the causal effect of children being assigned to more highly qualified teachers on their parents’ investments. Exploiting a unique setting in which teachers are randomly assigned to classes, we show that parents respond to more qualified teachers by increasing their children's private tutoring. A potential mechanism is an increase in parents’ belief that achievement is driven by student effort—for which tutoring is instrumental. Teacher qualifications are unrelated to test scores, however. Instead, they weaken students’ beliefs that effort is important for achievement, suggesting that private tutoring may have a demotivating effect on students. We conclude that family-wide behavioral reactions are important in educational production.

Suggested Citation

  • Chang, Simon & Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Salamanca, Nicolás, 2022. "Parents’ responses to teacher qualifications," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 197(C), pages 419-446.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:197:y:2022:i:c:p:419-446
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2022.03.009
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    1. Guilherme Lichand & Sharon Wolf, 2020. "Arm-wrestling in the classroom: the non-monotonic effects of monitoring teachers," ECON - Working Papers 357, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Feb 2021.
    2. Miriam Gensowski & Rasmus Landersø & Philip Dale & Anders Højen & Laura Justice & Dorthe Bleses, 2024. "Public and Parental Investments and Children’s Skill Formation," Working Papers 2024-011, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & Tiffany Ho & Nicolás Salamanca, 2021. "Parental Responses to Children’s Achievement Test Results," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2021n17, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    4. Gensowski, Miriam & Landerso, Rasmus & Dale, Philip & Hojen, Anders & Justice, Laura & Bleses, Dorthe, 2024. "Public and Parental Investments, and Children's Skill Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 16956, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Alexandra de Gendre & Nicolás Salamanca, 2020. "On the Mechanisms of Ability Peer Effects," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2020n19, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Teacher quality; Student achievement; Parental investment; Beliefs; School effort;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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