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Entertaining Malthus: Bread, Circuses and Economic Growth

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  • Rohan Dutta
  • David K Levine
  • Nicholas W Papageorge
  • Lemin Wu

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  • Rohan Dutta & David K Levine & Nicholas W Papageorge & Lemin Wu, 2016. "Entertaining Malthus: Bread, Circuses and Economic Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000001365, David K. Levine.
  • Handle: RePEc:cla:levarc:786969000000001365
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    Cited by:

    1. Matranga, Andrea, 2017. "The Ant and the Grasshopper: Seasonality and the Invention of Agriculture," MPRA Paper 76626, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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