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Unified Growth Theory and Comparative Development

Listed author(s):
  • Oded Galor

    ()

    (Brown University, Providence)

Unified Growth Theory explores the fundamental factors that have contributed to the remarkable transition from stagnation to growth and examines their significance for the understanding of the contemporary growth process of developed and less developed economies. Moreover, it sheds light on the role of historical and pre-historical characteristics in the divergence of income per capita across regions of the world in the past two centuries.

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Article provided by SIPI Spa in its journal Rivista di Politica Economica.

Volume (Year): (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (April-June)
Pages: 9-21

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Handle: RePEc:rpo:ripoec:y:2011:i:2:p:9-21
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2002. "Natural Selection and the Origin of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1133-1191.
  2. Matthias Doepke, 2004. "Accounting for Fertility Decline During the Transition to Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 347-383, 09.
  3. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 1999. "From Malthusian Stagnation to Modern Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 150-154, May.
  4. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
  5. Nico Voigtländer & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2006. "Why England? Demographic factors, structural change and physical capital accumulation during the Industrial Revolution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 319-361, December.
  6. Kevin H. O'Rourke, Ahmed S. Rahman and Alan M. Taylor, 2008. "Luddites and the Demographic Transition," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp266, IIIS.
  7. Oded Galor & Andrew Mountford, 2008. "Trading Population for Productivity: Theory and Evidence," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1143-1179.
  8. Holger Strulik & Jacob Weisdorf, 2008. "Population, food, and knowledge: a simple unified growth theory," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 195-216, September.
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