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Post-Malthusian Dynamics in Pre-Industrial Scandinavia

  • Marc Patrick Brag Klemp
  • Niels Framroze Møller

Theories of economic growth hypothesize that the transition from pre-industrial stagnation to sustained growth is associated with a post-Malthusian phase in which technological progress raises income and spurs population growth while offsetting diminishing returns to labour. Evidence suggests that England was characterized by post-Malthusian dynamics preceding the Industrial Revolution. However, given England's special position as the forerunner of the Industrial Revolution, it is unclear if a transitory post-Malthusian period is a general phenomenon. Using data from Denmark, Norway and Sweden, this research provides evidence for the existence of a post-Malthusian phase in the transition from stagnation to growth in Scandinavia

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Paper provided by Brown University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2013-14.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:bro:econwp:2013-14
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912

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