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Malthus in preindustrial Northern Italy?

Author

Listed:
  • Maja Pedersen

    (University of Southern Denmark)

  • Claudia Riani

    (I.R.T.A. – Leonardo)

  • Paul Sharp

    (University of Southern Denmark)

Abstract

The Malthusian model, which implies a long-run interaction between demography and living standards, forms a cornerstone of our understanding of comparative economic development, as postulated by unified growth theory. Its empirical validity has been supported by a number of studies, most of which examine England. In Northern Italy, however, there might have been a reversed “preventive check.” We employ a cointegrated VAR model on Italian data from ca. 1650–1799 and find some evidence for this, but also for diminishing returns and thus a more “Malthusian” society than in, for example, England at that time.

Suggested Citation

  • Maja Pedersen & Claudia Riani & Paul Sharp, 2021. "Malthus in preindustrial Northern Italy?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 34(3), pages 1003-1026, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:34:y:2021:i:3:d:10.1007_s00148-020-00812-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-020-00812-3
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