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Fertility Responses to Expectations of Child Mortality in a Tuscan Village 1700-1913: A Micro-Data Approach

Listed author(s):
  • Mette Ejrnes

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen University)

  • Karl Gunnar Persson

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen University)

Registered author(s):

    This paper exploits microdata from parish registers in a rural Tuscan village to trace the relationship between experienced and expected child mortality on household fertility strategies. It turns out that spacing of births and hence completed fertility are not only linked to economic risks and infant mortality but also to expected mortality risks as proxied by past child mortality in the village and in previous generations. The results indicate that before the demographic transition households made sequential fertility choices within marriage as a response to economic shocks as well as expected child mortality.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/dp_2014/1411.pdf
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    Paper provided by University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 14-10.

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    Length: 23 pages
    Date of creation: 24 Apr 2014
    Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:1411
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    Phone: (+45) 35 32 30 10
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    Web page: http://www.econ.ku.dk
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    1. Barro, Robert J & Becker, Gary S, 1989. "Fertility Choice in a Model of Economic Growth," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 481-501, March.
    2. Cinnirella, Francesco & Klemp, Marc P B & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2012. "Malthus in the Bedroom: Birth Spacing as a Preventive Check Mechanism in Pre-Modern England," CEPR Discussion Papers 9116, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Matthias Doepke, 2005. "Child mortality and fertility decline: Does the Barro-Becker model fit the facts?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(2), pages 337-366, 06.
    4. Fenoaltea Stefano, 2002. "Textile production in Italy, 1861-1913," Rivista di storia economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 3-40.
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