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Fertility Responses to Expectations of Child Mortality in a Tuscan Village 1700-1913: A Micro-Data Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Mette Ejrnes

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen University)

  • Karl Gunnar Persson

    (Department of Economics, Copenhagen University)

Abstract

This paper exploits microdata from parish registers in a rural Tuscan village to trace the relationship between experienced and expected child mortality on household fertility strategies. It turns out that spacing of births and hence completed fertility are not only linked to economic risks and infant mortality but also to expected mortality risks as proxied by past child mortality in the village and in previous generations. The results indicate that before the demographic transition households made sequential fertility choices within marriage as a response to economic shocks as well as expected child mortality.

Suggested Citation

  • Mette Ejrnes & Karl Gunnar Persson, 2014. "Fertility Responses to Expectations of Child Mortality in a Tuscan Village 1700-1913: A Micro-Data Approach," Discussion Papers 14-10, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:1411
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/dp_2014/1411.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Matthias Doepke, 2005. "Child mortality and fertility decline: Does the Barro-Becker model fit the facts?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(2), pages 337-366, June.
    2. Barro, Robert J & Becker, Gary S, 1989. "Fertility Choice in a Model of Economic Growth," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(2), pages 481-501, March.
    3. Francesco Cinnirella & Marc P. B. Klemp & Jacob L. Weisdorf, 2012. "Malthus in the Bedroom: Birth Spacing as a Preventive Check Mechanism in Pre-Modern England," CESifo Working Paper Series 3936, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Stefano Fenoaltea, 2002. "Textile production in Italy, 1861-1913," Rivista di storia economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 3-40.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:taf:sehrxx:v:64:y:2016:i:3:p:299-301 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:oup:ereveh:v:21:y:2017:i:1:p:133-139. is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Child mortality; Historical demography; Hazard model;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • N33 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies

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