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Persistent but not consistent: The growth of national income in Holland 1347–1807

  • van Zanden, Jan Luiten
  • van Leeuwen, Bas

In this paper we construct a detailed dataset of the national accounts of Holland (1347–1807). Using this dataset, we demonstrate that this economy was characterized by persistent economic growth caused by, depending on the period, structural change (share of industry and services in the economy increases), technological development, and factor substitution. During the entire period GDP per capita increased by on average 0.19% per year. This persistent growth, however, was highly unstable due largely to the importance of international services in the economy.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0014498311000611
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Explorations in Economic History.

Volume (Year): 49 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 119-130

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Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:49:y:2012:i:2:p:119-130
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622830

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  1. Buringh, Eltjo & Van Zanden, Jan Luiten, 2009. "Charting the “Rise of the West”: Manuscripts and Printed Books in Europe, A Long-Term Perspective from the Sixth through Eighteenth Centuries," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(02), pages 409-445, June.
  2. Mendels, Franklin F., 1972. "Proto-industrialization: The First Phase of the Industrialization Process," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(01), pages 241-261, March.
  3. Jerzmanowski, Michal, 2006. "Empirics of hills, plateaus, mountains and plains: A Markov-switching approach to growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 357-385, December.
  4. Pritchett, Lant, 2000. "Understanding Patterns of Economic Growth: Searching for Hills among Plateaus, Mountains, and Plains," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 221-50, May.
  5. van Zanden, Jan Luiten & van Tielhof, Milja, 2009. "Roots of growth and productivity change in Dutch shipping industry, 1500-1800," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 389-403, October.
  6. Van Zanden, Jan Luiten, 2002. "Taking the measure of the early modern economy: Historical national accounts for Holland in 1510/14," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(02), pages 131-163, August.
  7. Donald W.K. Andrews, 1990. "Tests for Parameter Instability and Structural Change with Unknown Change Point," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 943, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  8. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521570619 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Jan Luiten van Zanden & Arthur van Riel, 2004. "Introduction to The Strictures of Inheritance: The Dutch Economy in the Nineteenth Century
    [The Strictures of Inheritance: The Dutch Economy in the Nineteenth Century]
    ," Introductory Chapters, Princeton University Press.
  10. van Bavel, Bas (B.J.P.), 2003. "Early Proto-industrialization in the Low Countries? The Importance and Nature of Market-oriented Non-agricultural Activities on the Countryside in Flanders and Holland," MPRA Paper 42361, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Charles Feinstein & Mark Thomas, 2001. "A Plea for Errors," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _041, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  12. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521578257 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Malanima, Paolo, 2011. "The long decline of a leading economy: GDP in central and northern Italy, 1300–1913," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(02), pages 169-219, August.
  14. de Vries, Jan, 1994. "The Industrial Revolution and the Industrious Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 54(02), pages 249-270, June.
  15. Gregory Clark, 2007. "Introduction to A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World
    [A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World]
    ," Introductory Chapters, Princeton University Press.
  16. repec:dgr:rugggd:no.5 is not listed on IDEAS
  17. Charles H. Feinstein & Mark Thomas, 2001. "A Plea for Errors," Economics Series Working Papers 2001-W41, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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