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The Neolithic Revolution from a Price-Theoretic Perspective

  • Ricardo Andrés Guzmán

    (Universidad del Desarrollo, Chile)

  • Jacob Louis Weisdorf

    (Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen)

The adoption of agriculture during the Neolithic period triggered the first demographic explosion in history. When fertility returned to its original level, agriculturalists were more numerous, more poorly nourished, and worked longer hours than their hunter-gatherer ancestors. We develop a dynamic price-theoretic model that rationalizes these events. In the short run, people are lured into agriculture by the increased labor productivity of both adults and children. In the long run, the growth in population overrides the productivity gains, and the later generations of agriculturalists end up being worse off than the hunter-gatherers. Counter-intuitively, the increase in the labor productivity of children causes the long-run reduction in welfare. In the long run, the increase in adult labor productivity only contributes to population growth.

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Paper provided by University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 10-13.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:1013
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