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A Historical Perspective on Economic Aspects of the Population Explosion: The Case of Preindustrial England

In: Population and Economic Change in Developing Countries

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  • Ronald Lee

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Suggested Citation

  • Ronald Lee, 1980. "A Historical Perspective on Economic Aspects of the Population Explosion: The Case of Preindustrial England," NBER Chapters,in: Population and Economic Change in Developing Countries, pages 517-566 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:9671
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c9671.pdf
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    1. repec:cai:popine:popu_p1973_28n4-5_0857 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Uma K. Srivastava & Earl O. Heady, 1973. "Technological Change and Relative Factor Shares in Indian Agriculture: An Empirical Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 55(3), pages 509-514.
    3. Cohen, Jon S. & Weitzman, Martin L., 1975. "A Marxian model of enclosures," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 287-336.
    4. Simon, Julian L, 1976. " Population Growth May Be Good for LDCs in the Long Run: A Richer Simulation Model," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(2), pages 309-337, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jones Charles I., 2001. "Was an Industrial Revolution Inevitable? Economic Growth Over the Very Long Run," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, pages 1-45.
    2. Bruno Chiarini, 2010. "The economic consequences of population and urbanization growth in Italy: from the 13th century to 1900. A discussion on the Malthusian dynamics," Discussion Papers 2_2010, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    3. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 806-828.
    4. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 806-828.
    5. S. R. Osmani, 1996. "Famine, demography and endemic poverty," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 597-623.
    6. BEHRENS, Kristian, 2004. "Population growth and manufacturing real wages in 18th century England: a spatial perspective," CORE Discussion Papers 2004025, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    7. Chiarini, Bruno, 2010. "Was Malthus right? The relationship between population and real wages in Italian history, 1320 to 1870," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(4), pages 460-475, October.
    8. Murat F. Iyigun & Ann L. Owen, 1999. "From indoctrination to the culture of change: technological progress, adaptive skills, and the creativity of nations," International Finance Discussion Papers 642, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    9. Oded Galor & David N. Weil, 1998. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From the Malthusian Regime to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," NBER Working Papers 6811, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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