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The Effects of Longevity and Distortions on Education and Retirement

  • Pedro Cavalcanti Ferreira

    (Fundacao Getulio Vargas)

  • Samuel de Abreu Pessoa

    (Fundacao Getulio Vargas)

This article studies the impact of longevity and taxation on life-cycle decisions and long run income. Individuals allocate optimally their total lifetime between education, working and retirement. They also decide at each moment how much to save or consume out of their income, and, after entering the labor market, how to divide their time between labor and leisure. The model incorporates experience-earnings profiles and return to education function that follows evidence from the labor literature. In this setup increases in longevity raises the investment in education - time in school - and retirement. The model is calibrated to the U.S. and is able to reproduce observed schooling trends of the last century. It also reproduces the increase in retirement, as the evidence shows. Simulations show that a country equal to the U.S. but with 20% smaller longevity will be 25% poorer, mostly because of the impact of life expectancy on human capital formation and retirement. In this economy labor taxes has a strong impact on the per capita income, as it decreases labor effort, time at school and retirement age, in addition to the general equilibrium impact over physical capital. (Copyright: Elsevier)

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.red.2007.01.003
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Article provided by Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics in its journal Review of Economic Dynamics.

Volume (Year): 10 (2007)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 472-493

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Handle: RePEc:red:issued:05-49
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