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The Effects of Longevity and Distortions on Education and Retirement

Author

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  • Pedro Cavalcanti Ferreira

    (Fundacao Getulio Vargas)

  • Samuel de Abreu Pessoa

    (Fundacao Getulio Vargas)

Abstract

This article studies the impact of longevity and taxation on life-cycle decisions and long run income. Individuals allocate optimally their total lifetime between education, working and retirement. They also decide at each moment how much to save or consume out of their income, and, after entering the labor market, how to divide their time between labor and leisure. The model incorporates experience-earnings profiles and return to education function that follows evidence from the labor literature. In this setup increases in longevity raises the investment in education - time in school - and retirement. The model is calibrated to the U.S. and is able to reproduce observed schooling trends of the last century. It also reproduces the increase in retirement, as the evidence shows. Simulations show that a country equal to the U.S. but with 20% smaller longevity will be 25% poorer, mostly because of the impact of life expectancy on human capital formation and retirement. In this economy labor taxes has a strong impact on the per capita income, as it decreases labor effort, time at school and retirement age, in addition to the general equilibrium impact over physical capital. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Pedro Cavalcanti Ferreira & Samuel de Abreu Pessoa, 2007. "The Effects of Longevity and Distortions on Education and Retirement," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 472-493, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:05-49 DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2007.01.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Aloisio Araujo & Mario Pascoa & Juan Pablo Torres-Martinez, 2005. "Bubbles, collateral and monetary equilibrium," Textos para discussão 513, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    2. Bonomo, Marco Antônio Cesar & Terra, Maria Cristina T., 2005. "Special interests and political business cycles," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 597, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    3. Ferreira, Pedro Cavalcanti & Delalibera, Bruno Ricardo, 2016. "Economic growth and complementarity between stages of human capital," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 779, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    4. Pedro Cavalcanti Ferreira & Marcelo Rodrigues dos Santos, 2013. "The Effect of Social Security, Health, Demography and Technology on Retirement," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(2), pages 350-370, April.
    5. Sánchez-Romero, Miguel & d׳Albis, Hippolyte & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2016. "Education, lifetime labor supply, and longevity improvements," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 118-141.
    6. Mizuno, Masakatsu & Yakita, Akira, 2013. "Elderly labor supply and fertility decisions in aging-population economies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 395-399.
    7. Ferreira, Pedro Cavalcanti & Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues dos, 2008. "The effect of social security, demography and technology on retirement," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 683, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    8. Rosa Aísa & Fernando Pueyo & Marcos Sanso, 2012. "Life expectancy and labor supply of the elderly," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 545-568.
    9. Aisa, Rosa & Larramona, Gemma & Pueyo, Fernando, 2015. "Active aging, preventive health and dependency: Heterogeneous workers, differential behavior," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 1-9.
    10. Flôres Junior, Renato Galvão & Watanuki, Masakazu, 2006. "Integration options for mercosul - an investigation Uusing the AMIDA Model," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 610, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    11. Barbosa, Fernando de Holanda, 2005. "The contagion effect of public debt on monetary policy: the brazilian experience," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 591, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    12. Cysne, Rubens Penha, 2006. "Income inequality in a job-search model with heterogeneous discount factors: (revised version, forthcoming 2006, Revista Economia)," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 611, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    13. Gerdie Everaert & Freddy Heylen & Ruben Schoonackers, 2014. "Fiscal policy and TFP in the OECD : Measuring direct and indirect effects," Working Paper Research 274, National Bank of Belgium.
    14. Cysne, Rubens Penha, 2006. "An intra-household approach to the welfare costs of inflation (Revised Version, Forthcoming 2006, Estudos Econômicos)," FGV/EPGE Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 612, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    15. R. Schoonackers & F. Heylen, 2011. "Fiscal Policy and TFP in the OECD: A Non-Stationary Panel Approach," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 11/701, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    16. Daishin Yasui, 2012. "Adult Longevity and Growth Takeoff," Discussion Papers 1218, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
    17. Gerdie Everaert & Freddy Heylen & Ruben Schoonackers, 2015. "Fiscal policy and TFP in the OECD: measuring direct and indirect effects," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 605-640.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Life expectancy; Human capital; Retirement; Long run income;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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