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Elderly labor supply and fertility decisions in aging-population economies


  • Mizuno, Masakatsu
  • Yakita, Akira


With a longer life expectancy, individuals who plan to work when they are old may increase the number of their children. Therefore, when individuals choose the time of retirement, the fertility rate may not necessarily decline but even rise.

Suggested Citation

  • Mizuno, Masakatsu & Yakita, Akira, 2013. "Elderly labor supply and fertility decisions in aging-population economies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(3), pages 395-399.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:121:y:2013:i:3:p:395-399 DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.09.022

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hu, Sheng Cheng, 1979. "Social Security, the Supply of Labor, and Capital Accumulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(3), pages 274-283, June.
    2. Pedro Cavalcanti Ferreira & Samuel de Abreu Pessoa, 2007. "The Effects of Longevity and Distortions on Education and Retirement," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(3), pages 472-493, July.
    3. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson, 2007. "Disease and Development: The Effect of Life Expectancy on Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(6), pages 925-985, December.
    4. Hazan, Moshe & Zoabi, Hosny, 2005. "Does Longevity Cause Growth?," CEPR Discussion Papers 4931, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Moshe Hazan & Hosny Zoabi, 2006. "Does longevity cause growth? A theoretical critique," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 363-376, December.
    6. Peter Lorentzen & John McMillan & Romain Wacziarg, 2008. "Death and development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 81-124, June.
    7. Feldstein, Martin S, 1976. "Social Security and Saving: The Extended Life Cycle Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(2), pages 77-86, May.
    8. Kiminori Matsuyama, 2008. "A One-Sector Neoclassical Growth Model With Endogenous Retirement," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 59(2), pages 139-155.
    9. Bloom, David E. & Canning, David & Mansfield, Richard K. & Moore, Michael, 2007. "Demographic change, social security systems, and savings," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 92-114, January.
    10. Romain Duval, 2003. "The Retirement Effects of Old-Age Pension and Early Retirement Schemes in OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 370, OECD Publishing.
    11. Eckstein, Zvi & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1985. "Endogenous fertility and optimal population size," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 93-106, June.
    12. Rosa Aísa & Fernando Pueyo & Marcos Sanso, 2012. "Life expectancy and labor supply of the elderly," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 545-568, January.
    13. Akira Yakita, 2001. "Uncertain lifetime, fertility and social security," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(4), pages 635-640.
    14. Makoto Hirazawa & Koji Kitaura & Akira Yakita, 2014. "Fertility, Intra-Generational Redistribution, and Social Security Sustainability," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 47(1), pages 98-114, February.
    15. Jie Zhang & Junsen Zhang, 2005. "The Effect of Life Expectancy on Fertility, Saving, Schooling and Economic Growth: Theory and Evidence," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(1), pages 45-66, March.
    16. Liutang Gong & Nianqing Liu, 2012. "A Note On “A One-Sector Neoclassical Growth Model With Endogenous Retirement”: Existence Of Multiple Steady States," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 63(4), pages 557-569, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miyazaki, Koichi, 2014. "Optimal pay-as-you-go social security when retirement is endogenous and labor productivity depreciates," MPRA Paper 61166, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Cipriani, Giam Pietro, 2016. "Aging, Retirement and Pay-As-You-Go Pensions," IZA Discussion Papers 9969, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Miyake, Yusuke & Yasuoka, Masaya, 2016. "Subsidy Policy and Elderly Labor," MPRA Paper 75704, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Hirazawa, Makoto & Yakita, Akira, 2017. "Labor supply of elderly people, fertility, and economic development," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 75-96.

    More about this item


    Elderly labor; Fertility; Life expectancy; Heterogeneous ability;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies


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