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The Transition from Stagnation to Growth: An Adaptive Learning Approach

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  • Arifovic, Jasmina
  • Bullard, James
  • Duffy, John

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  • Arifovic, Jasmina & Bullard, James & Duffy, John, 1997. "The Transition from Stagnation to Growth: An Adaptive Learning Approach," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 185-209, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jecgro:v:2:y:1997:i:2:p:185-209
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Galor, Oded & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1997. "The Distribution of Human Capital and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 93-124, March.
    3. Goodfriend, Marvin & McDermott, John, 1995. "Early Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 116-133, March.
    4. James B. Bullard & John Duffy, 1995. "On learning and the stability of cycles," Working Papers 1995-006, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    5. Bullard, James & Duffy, John, 1998. "A model of learning and emulation with artificial adaptive agents," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 179-207, February.
    6. Azariadis, Costas, 1996. "The Economics of Poverty Traps: Part One: Complete Markets," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 1(4), pages 449-496, December.
    7. Miller, John H., 1996. "The coevolution of automata in the repeated Prisoner's Dilemma," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 87-112, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Voxi Heinrich Amavilah, 2003. "Resource Inefficiency and Poor Aggregate Economic Performance in African Countries: The Case of Namibia, 1968-1992," Development and Comp Systems 0307005, EconWPA.
    2. Bullard, James & Duffy, John, 2001. "Learning And Excess Volatility," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(02), pages 272-302, April.
    3. Albert Marcet & Juan P. Nicolini, 2003. "Recurrent Hyperinflations and Learning," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1476-1498, December.
    4. Bullard, James & Duffy, John, 1999. "Using Genetic Algorithms to Model the Evolution of Heterogeneous Beliefs," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 13(1), pages 41-60, February.
    5. Gomes, Orlando, 2009. "Stability under learning: The endogenous growth problem," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 807-816, September.
    6. Jakob Grazzini, 2011. "Consistent Estimation of Agent Based Models," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 110, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    7. Gary D. Hansen & Edward C. Prescott, 2002. "Malthus to Solow," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1205-1217, September.
    8. Albert Marcet & Juan Pablo Nicolini, 2005. "Money and Prices in Models of Bounded Rationality in High Inflation Economies," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 8(2), pages 452-479, April.
    9. Chia-Hsuan Yeh & Shu-Heng Chen, 2000. "Toward An Integration Of Social Learning And Individual Learning In Agent-Based Computational Stock Markets:The Approach Based On Population Genetic Programming," Computing in Economics and Finance 2000 338, Society for Computational Economics.
    10. Arifovic, Jasmina, 2001. "Evolutionary dynamics of currency substitution," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 395-417, March.
    11. Mario Villalpando, 2014. "Bank Credit and Productivity: Evidence from Mexican Firms," Remef - The Mexican Journal of Economics and Finance, Instituto Mexicano de Ejecutivos de Finanzas. Remef, October.
    12. Lemin Wu & Rohan Dutta & David K Levine & Nicholas W Papageorge, 2014. "Entertaining Malthus: Bread, Circuses and Economic Growth," Levine's Bibliography 786969000000000853, UCLA Department of Economics.
    13. Arifovic, Jasmina & Gencay, Ramazan, 2000. "Statistical properties of genetic learning in a model of exchange rate," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 24(5-7), pages 981-1005, June.
    14. Tommaso Ciarli & Andre' Lorentz & Maria Savona & Marco Valente, 2012. "The role of technology, organisation, and demand in growth and income distribution," LEM Papers Series 2012/06, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    15. V. Heinrich Amavilah, 2003. "The Ebbinghaus Effect and the Implications of Net Learning for the Performance of Production Systems, with Some Experimental Results," Experimental 0307002, EconWPA.
    16. Sergey Slobodyan, 1999. "Sunspot Fluctuations: A Way Out of a Development Trap?," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 922, Society for Computational Economics.
    17. Dow, Gregory K. & Reed, Clyde G., 2011. "Stagnation and innovation before agriculture," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 339-350, March.
    18. Grazzini Jakob, 2011. "Estimating Micromotives from Macrobehavior," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201111, University of Turin.
    19. Chen, Shu-Heng & Yeh, Chia-Hsuan, 2001. "Evolving traders and the business school with genetic programming: A new architecture of the agent-based artificial stock market," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 363-393, March.
    20. Shu-Heng Chen & Chia-Hsuan Yeh, 1999. "Evolving Traders and the Faculty of the Business School: A New Architecture of the Artificial Stock Market," Computing in Economics and Finance 1999 613, Society for Computational Economics.

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