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The Economy of Europe in an Age of Crisis, 1600–1750

Author

Listed:
  • de Vries,Jan

Abstract

By relating economic changes to the political backdrop, The Economy of Europe in an Age of Crisis, 1600–1750 describes and analyzes the economic civilisation of Europe in the last epoch before the Industrial Revolution. The author makes a special effort to apply economic reasoning to the economic forces of the period and challenges some longstanding opinions about what was and was not important in explaining economic performance. The significance of this study rests in its identification of the ways a 'traditional' society developed its economy despite the absence of the obvious growth factors of the nineteenth century. The approach is consciously comparative: problems of interpretation are identified; research not yet available elsewhere is incorporated into the text; and examples are drawn from minor as well as major countries in western and central Europe. Topics dealt with include the development of agriculture and industry, foreign and regional trade, urbanization, a study of demand in explaining economic growth, the bourgeoisie, and the state.

Suggested Citation

  • de Vries,Jan, 1976. "The Economy of Europe in an Age of Crisis, 1600–1750," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521290500, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521290500
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    Cited by:

    1. César Calderón & Alberto Chong, 2006. "Rent Seeking and Democracy in Latin America: What Drives What?," Research Department Publications 4435, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    2. repec:cup:jechis:v:78:y:2018:i:03:p:637-672_00 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Sugimoto, Yoshiaki & Nakagawa, Masao, 2011. "Endogenous trade policy: Political struggle in the growth process," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 12-29, February.
    4. repec:eee:deveco:v:127:y:2017:i:c:p:339-354 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Maria Waldinger, 2015. "The economic effects of long-term climate change: evidence from the little ice age," GRI Working Papers 214, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    6. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:56:y:2018:i:1:p:358-380 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Chilosi, David & Schulze, Max-Stephan & Volckart, Oliver, 2018. "Benefits of Empire? Capital Market Integration North and South of the Alps, 1350–1800," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 78(03), pages 637-672, September.
    8. Flückiger, Matthias & Ludwig, Markus, 2017. "Malaria suitability, urbanization and persistence: Evidence from China over more than 2000 years," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 146-160.
    9. Shuo Chen & James Kai-sing Kung, 2016. "Of maize and men: the effect of a New World crop on population and economic growth in China," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 71-99, March.
    10. Daniel Oto-Peralías & Diego Romero-Ávila, 2016. "The economic consequences of the Spanish Reconquest: the long-term effects of Medieval conquest and colonization," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 409-464, December.
    11. Steven Brakman & Herman de Jong & Maarten Bosker & Harry Garretsen & Marc Schramm, 2007. "The Development of Cities in Italy 1300-1861," Working Papers 7012, Economic History Society.
    12. Acemoglu, Daron & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 1997. "Was Prometheus Unbound by Chance? Risk, Diversification, and Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(4), pages 709-751, August.
    13. Rohan Dutta & David K. Levine & Nicholas W. Papageorge & Lemin Wu, 2018. "Entertaining Malthus: Bread, Circuses, And Economic Growth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(1), pages 358-380, January.
    14. Chris Hudson, 2016. "Witch Trials: Discontent in Early Modern Europe," IHEID Working Papers 11-2016, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    15. repec:taf:acbsfi:v:27:y:2017:i:1:p:73-99 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Mark Koyama, 2009. "The Price of Time and Labour Supply: From the Black Death to the Industrious Revolution," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _078, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    17. Ogilvie, Sheilagh & Carus, A.W., 2014. "Institutions and Economic Growth in Historical Perspective," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 8, pages 403-513 Elsevier.

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