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Do Uncertainty Shocks Always Matter for Business Cycles?

Author

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  • Stéphane Lhuissier
  • Fabien Tripier

Abstract

The answer to the title question is no. Fitting a Markov-switching structural vector autoregression to U.S. data, we show that uncertainty affects real economy differentially depending on the state of financial markets; e.g., an adverse shock that causes a 10 percentage points increase in the VIX index implies a one percent output decline in a regime of financial stress, but effects that are close to zero in tranquil regime. We use this evidence to estimate key parameters of a business cycle model, in which agents are aware of the possibility of regime switches in the transmission mechanism. We show that the differences in dynamics across regimes do not only result from changes in the degree of financial frictions, but also on agents’ expectations around these changes. Pessimistic expectations about future financial conditions amplify contractionary effects of uncertainty shocks on aggregate activity.

Suggested Citation

  • Stéphane Lhuissier & Fabien Tripier, 2016. "Do Uncertainty Shocks Always Matter for Business Cycles?," Working Papers 2016-19, CEPII research center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cii:cepidt:2016-19
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lhuissier, Stéphane & Zabelina, Margarita, 2015. "On the stability of Calvo-style price-setting behavior," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 77-95.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Giovanni Caggiano & Efrem Castelnuovo & Silvia Delrio & Richard Kima, 2020. "Financial Uncertainty and Real Activity: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0255, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
    2. Laurent Ferrara & Stéphane Lhuissier & Fabien Tripier, 2017. "Uncertainty Fluctuations: Measures, Effects and Macroeconomic Policy Challenges," CEPII Policy Brief 2017-20, CEPII research center.
    3. Xiaoji Lin & Nicholas Bloom & Ivan Alfaro, 2017. "The Finance-Uncertainty Multiplier," 2017 Meeting Papers 887, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Shayan Zakipour-Saber, 2019. "Monetary policy regimes and inflation persistence in the United Kingdom," Working Papers 895, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    5. Alessandri, Piergiorgio & Mumtaz, Haroon, 2019. "Financial regimes and uncertainty shocks," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 31-46.
    6. Lhuissier, Stéphane, 2017. "Financial intermediaries’ instability and euro area macroeconomic dynamics," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 49-72.
    7. Liang, Chin Chia & Troy, Carol & Rouyer, Ellen, 2020. "U.S. uncertainty and Asian stock prices: Evidence from the asymmetric NARDL model," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C).
    8. Mehmet Balcilar & Rangan Gupta & Theshne Kisten, 2020. "The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks in South Africa: The Role of Financial Regimes," Working Papers 202046, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    9. Fontaine, Idriss & Razafindravaosolonirina, Justinien & Didier, Laurent, 2018. "Chinese policy uncertainty shocks and the world macroeconomy: Evidence from STVAR," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 1-19.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Uncertainty Shocks; Regime Switch; Financial Frictions; Expectation Effects;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy

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