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Imperfect Information about Financial Frictions and Consequences for the Business Cycle

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  • Josef Hollmayr

    (Deutsche Bundesbank)

  • Michael Kuehl

    (Deutsche Bundesbank)

Abstract

In this paper, we discuss the consequences of imperfect information about financial frictions on the macroeconomy. We rely on a New Keynesian DSGE model with a banking sector in which we introduce imperfect information about a limited enforcement problem. Bank managers like to divert resources and can increase the share of diversion. This can only be observed imperfectly by depositors. The ensuing imperfect information generates a higher volatility of the business cycle. Spillovers from the financial sector to the real economy are higher and shocks in general are considerably amplified in the transition period until agents' learning is complete. Volatility and other second-order moments also display an amplification under the learning setup compared with the rational expectations framework. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Josef Hollmayr & Michael Kuehl, 2016. "Imperfect Information about Financial Frictions and Consequences for the Business Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 22, pages 179-207, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:15-131
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2016.07.004
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    Cited by:

    1. André Marine Charlotte & Dai Meixing, 2018. "Learning, robust monetary policy and the merit of precaution," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 18(2), pages 1-20, June.
    2. André, Marine Charlotte & Dai, Meixing, 2017. "Is central bank conservatism desirable under learning?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 281-296.
    3. Hollmayr, Josef & Kühl, Michael, 2019. "Learning about banks’ net worth and the slow recovery after the financial crisis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 109(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DSGE model; Financial frictions; Learning;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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