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Financial Frictions, Financial Shocks, and Aggregate Volatility

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  • Cristina Fuentes-Albero

    () (Rutgers University, Department of Economics)

Abstract

The two main empirical regularities regarding US postwar nominal and real business cycles are the Great Inflation and the Great Moderation. While the volatility of financial price variables also follows such pattern, financial quantity variables have experienced a continuous immoderation. We examine these patterns in volatility by estimating a DSGE model with financial frictions and financial shocks allowing for structural breaks in the size of shocks and the institutional framework. We conclude that (i ) while the Great Inflation was driven by bad luck, the Great Moderation is mostly due to better financial institutions; (ii ) financial shocks are the main drivers of financial variables, investment, and the nominal interest rate and play a secondary role as drivers of consumption, output, inflation, and hours worked; (iii ) investment-specific technology shocks play an almost negligible role as drivers of the US business cycle. Creation-Date: 2012-02-03

Suggested Citation

  • Cristina Fuentes-Albero, "undated". "Financial Frictions, Financial Shocks, and Aggregate Volatility," Departmental Working Papers 201201, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:rut:rutres:201201
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Galvão, Ana Beatriz & Giraitis, Liudas & Kapetanios, George & Petrova, Katerina, 2016. "A time varying DSGE model with financial frictions," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(PB), pages 690-716.
    2. Adam Gulan & Andres Fernandez, 2012. "Interest Rates and Business Cycles in Emerging Economies.The Role of Financial Frictions," 2012 Meeting Papers 849, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Haroon Mumtaz & Konstantinos Theodoridis, 2016. "Volatility Co-movement and the Great Moderation. An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers 804, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
    4. Alan Finkelstein-Shapiro & Andrés González Gómez, 2015. "Macroprudential Policy and Labor Market Dynamics in Latin America," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 88738, Inter-American Development Bank.
    5. Andrés Fernández & Adam Gulan, 2015. "Interest Rates, Leverage, and Business Cycles in Emerging Economies: The Role of Financial Frictions," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 153-188, July.
    6. Andrés Fernández & Adam Gulan, 2015. "Interest Rates, Leverage, and Business Cycles in Emerging Economies: The Role of Financial Frictions," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 153-188, July.
    7. Josef Hollmayr & Michael Kuehl, 2016. "Imperfect Information about Financial Frictions and Consequences for the Business Cycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 22, pages 179-207, October.
    8. Alan Finkelstein Shapiro & Andres Gonzalez, 2015. "Macroprudential Policy and Labor Market Dynamics in Emerging Economies," IMF Working Papers 15/78, International Monetary Fund.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial frictions; financial shocks; structural break; Great Moderation; Great Inflation;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General

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