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Can financial frictions help explain the performance of the us fed?

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  • Blas Pérez, Beatriz de

Abstract

This paper analyzes the contribution of additional factors, apart from monetary policy, to the stabilization of the economy observed in the US since the 1980s. I estimate a limited participation model with financial frictions, allowing for changes in the interest rate rule, financial frictions, and shock processes. The results confirm the well-known differences in the interest rate rules between subsamples. However, when monitoring costs are considered, these differences are much smaller. A comparison of fit across several specifications finds that a decrease in financial frictions was more important than changed monetary policy or changed shock processes in stabilizing the economy. These results highlight the important differences in the effects of shocks and policies between limited participation and sticky price models.

Suggested Citation

  • Blas Pérez, Beatriz de, 2004. "Can financial frictions help explain the performance of the us fed?," UC3M Working papers. Economics we044517, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
  • Handle: RePEc:cte:werepe:we044517
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    Cited by:

    1. Douglas Sutherland & Peter Hoeller & Balázs Égert & Oliver Röhn, 2010. "Counter-cyclical Economic Policy," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 760, OECD Publishing.
    2. Andrea Silvestrini & Andrea Zaghini, 2015. "Financial shocks and the real economy in a nonlinear world: a survey of the theoretical and empirical literature," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 255, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Dominguez, Begona & Gomis-Porqueras, Pedro, 2016. "The Effects of Secondary Markets for Government Bonds on Inflation Dynamics," MPRA Paper 82448, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Zaghini, Andrea & Bencivelli, Lorenzo, 2012. "Financial innovation, macroeconomic volatility and the great moderation," MPRA Paper 41263, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Dominguez, Begona & Gomis-Porqueras, Pedro, 2016. "The Effects of Secondary Markets and Unsecured Credit on Inflation Dynamics," MPRA Paper 75096, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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