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Financial innovation, macroeconomic volatility and the great moderation

  • Zaghini, Andrea
  • Bencivelli, Lorenzo

In the paper we propose an assessment of the role of financial innovation in shaping US macroeconomic dynamics. We extend an existing model by Christiano, Eichenbaum and Evans which studied the transmission of monetary policy impulses to business and corporate sector financing variables just before the Great Moderation period. By investigating the properties of the model over a longer time span we show that in the later period a change in the monetary policy transmission mechanism is likely to have occurred. In particular, we argue that the role of financial innovation has significantly altered the transmission of shocks

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/41263/1/MPRA_paper_41263.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 41263.

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Date of creation: 01 Sep 2012
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:41263
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  1. Jordi Galí & Luca Gambetti, 2006. "On the sources of the Great Moderation," Economics Working Papers 1041, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jun 2007.
  2. Oleg Korenok & Stanislav Radchenko, 2006. "The role of permanent and transitory components in business cycle volatility moderation," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 217-241, March.
  3. Alessandro Calza & Andrea Zaghini, 2011. "Sectoral money demand and the great disinflation in the US," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 785, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  4. Stephen G. Cecchetti & Alfonso Flores-Lagunes & Stefan Krause, 2004. "Has Monetary Policy Become More Efficient? A Cross Country Analysis," NBER Working Papers 10973, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Andrew Ang & Monika Piazzesi & Min Wei, 2004. "What Does the Yield Curve Tell us about GDP Growth?," NBER Working Papers 10672, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. James D. Hamilton & Dong Heon Kim, 2000. "A Re-examination of the Predictability of Economic Activity Using the Yield Spread," NBER Working Papers 7954, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Vladimir Yankov & Egon Zakrajsek & Simon Gilchrist, 2009. "Credit Market Shocks and Economic Fluctuations: Evidence from Corporate Bond and Stock Markets," 2009 Meeting Papers 514, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  8. Beatriz de-Blas-Pérez, 2004. "Can Financial Frictions Help Explain The Performance Of The Us Fed?," Economics Working Papers we044517, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  9. Canova, Fabio & Gambetti, Luca, 2009. "Do expectations matter? The Great Moderation revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 7597, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. Canova, Fabio & Gambetti, Luca, 2009. "Structural changes in the US economy: Is there a role for monetary policy?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 477-490, February.
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